Yankees: Carlos Correa takes shot at Derek Jeter for Gold Gloves he ‘didn’t deserve’

derek jeter, carlos correa, yankees

As if the Yankees needed another reason to hate Carlos Correa after that cheating scandal with the Houston Astros, he proceeded to say how “Derek Jeter didn’t deserve any of the gold gloves he won.”

Correa is one of the top shortstops in baseball and is in line for a massive contract extension, which could possibly land with the Yankees and general manager Brian Cashman. Cashman isn’t exactly the biggest fan of Jeter after years of turmoil, so Correa’s comments likely won’t impact his status within the organization. However, among the fans, he’s quickly losing stock or whatever he had left of it.

Correa finished the most recent season with a .279 batting average, 26 homers, and 92 RBIs. His career-low 18.1% strikeout rate and 26.3 offensive WAR would be a welcome sight for Yankee fans, despite his comments about one of the team’s most prolific players in its history.

Some might ask how Yankee fans can still want Correa after what he said about Jeter? Ultimately it boils down to production. Jeter is a thing of the past, and while beloved by every fan, Correa could be the missing piece to a World Series appearance, which would erase any ill feelings toward the Astros star.

Of course, the team has plenty of options at shortstop this off-season, including Corey Seager, who would be a solid acquisition given his lefty bat and ability to translate to third base. Eventually, the Yankees want to elevate Anthony Volpe to take over SS full-time, and Seager can move to that hot corner, where they can maximize his skill set without any bad blood.

However, with a potential lockout impending, the Yankees might make a move sooner rather than later, prior to December 1. The expectation is that both Seager and Marcus Semien will sign before that date, but Correa could wait until after the lockout finishes to sign a monster deal.

New York Yankee Top 10s: Great Yankee Shortstops

New York Yankees, Derek Jeter

The New York Yankees in their 108-year glorious history have had their share of great baseball players.  From Babe Ruth to Joe DiMaggio to Ron Guidry, Derek Jeter, and dozens more, some of the best baseball players in history have graced Yankee Stadium.  I have many top Yankee 10s. but after writing this morning about the shortstops the Yankees may target to add to the team this off-season, I thought it might be a good idea to look at some of the best Yankees shortstops ever. With so many shortstops, some writers will differ in the order of their preferences.  Here are this writer’s top 10.

One through five is relatively easy, beyond that gets more difficult as the New York Yankees are more known for their outfielders, 2nd and 3rd baseman. If the Yankees have a position that is the weakest in their history, it is probably at shortstop. Also, the Yankees have had players that were known for their offense and defense of their positions, but they were more well known at another position. A good example is Alex Rodgriguez, one of the top five shortstops in all of the baseball lore, but he played 3rd base for the Yankees. Joe Sewell, the Hall of Fame shortstop, could have been included in this list, but I did not consider him as he only played for two years for the Yankees.

10.  Tom Tresh

First, let me say about Tom Tresh that he would have been in the top five with the exception that he played more in the New York Yankee Stadium outfield than in at short. Tresh played nine years for the Yankees with a career batting average of .247 with 140 home runs, five seasons with 20 or more, while being an excellent defender at both short and in the outfield.

9. Gene Micheal

Gene Michael was valuable to the New York Yankees, as a player, coach, manager, and in the front office.  He was as much responsible for the last ’90s, 2000’s Yankee dynasty as anyone in the organization. Michael started his seven-year stint with the Yankees in 1968. He was not known as a hitter and less so as a long-ball hitter.  What he was known for was his excellent defense at short.  He is another Yankees that could have ranked higher on this list if his offense was in line with his defense.

8. Mark Koenig

Many present-day fans don’t know Mark Koenig, he played for the Yankees for six years starting in 1925.  Koenig was an excellent hitter for that time, hitting .285.  He was not a home run hitter but hit for contact.  In 1928 he hit .319 for the season.   He was agile at short and played 2nd and 3rd when needed.  In 1927 he had third-most assists at shortstop in all of baseball (423).  In the World Series that the Yankees lost that year, he hit .500 without any errors in 28 chances.

7. Kid Elberfeld

Kid Elberfeld is another Yankee that few fans don’t remember.  He played short for the New York Yankees between 1903 and 1909.  In his seven years, he averaged .268 with 28 home runs.  As with many players at that time, he played all infield positions with the exception of the 1st base.  His fielding average was .938, which was excellent for shortstops at that time.

6. Bucky Dent

Some may say that Bucky Dent should be further down this list or not on it it all.  I place him sixth due to his exceptional spotlight play in the 1978 one-game playoff with the Red Sox. Dent hit .239 while with the Yankees and was an All-Star twice mostly because of his defense.  Dent was primarily known as a clutch contact hitter hitting 518 hits as a Yankee.

5. Frank Crosetti

Frank Crosetti is my choice as the 5th best Yankee shortstop.  Crosetti played his entire 17-year career with the Yankees, which brings him up on the list substantially. He hit .245 with over a thousand runs scored.  He was a two-time All-Star and a three-time MVP candidate.  Crossetti started his career at short for the Yankees in 1932, a position he held until a poor season in 1940 when Hall of Famer Phil Rizzuto took over for him at short.  But he retook the job when Rizzuto left for the Navy. Rizzuto rejoined the club in  946. Crosetti then became a player/coach for the club when he retired in 1948.  He had a .948 fielding percentage as a Yankee

4. Roger Peckinpaugh

Roger Peckinpaugh was a Yankee for nine years and was an MVP candidate in 1914 when he was a player/manager.  He is the only one on the list to have managed the Yankees. He had a .949 fielding average while with the Yankees, which was quite good for that era.  He had a .259 batting average over the span.  He was known as a contact hitter with the ability to steal bases.  He stole 38 in 1914.  In 1921 Peckinpaugh led all of baseball with the most assists in one game (9).  After leaving the Yankees, he had a long managerial career ending with the Indians in 1941.  He later became general manager and president of the Indians.

3. Tony Kubek

Tony Kubek was one of the most beloved New York Yankees. He played for 9 years with the Yankees in 1957 he won the Rookie of the Year award.  He played from 1957 to 1965.  He was an All-Star four times and was an MVP candidate three times.  Kubek is the first utility player to make the list, and although he played all over the field, 80% of his games were played at short, which is where he won all his awards.  The only position that Kubek did not play for the Yankees is that of pitcher or catcher.  In Game Seven of the 1960 World Series, he bungled a double play when he was hit in the throat by a bad hop that knocked him out.  At short, he had an excellent .967 fielding percentage.

2.  Phil Rizzuto

Known as much for his career in broadcasting and his onfield play at short. Rizutto can not be overlooked as one of the best Yankee shortstops ever. The “Scooter” had a .968 fielding percentage at short in his 13 Yankee seasons.  Rizzuto was of small stature, and the manager at the time that Rizzuto made his major league debut in 1941 Joe McCarthy once said Rizzuto was too small to be a good baseball player.  History has shown that McCarthy was very wrong.  IN 13 years, he had a fielding percentage of .968.  He hit .273 over the life of his career with almost 1,600 hits over the span.  Rizzuto the five-time All-Star was an MVP candidate eight-time capturing the award in 1950.  Rizzuto was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. When he left the Yankees in 1956, he had over 1200 double-plays under his belt.

He contributed to seven Yankee World Series championships and is sixth all-time in World Series games played, eighth in hits with 45, fourth in walks with 30, and tied for third in stolen bases with 10. Rizzuto would go on to have an exceptional 40 years broadcasting on radio and TV for the New York Yankees.  His folksy style embraced him to the Yankee fans.  His signature “Holy Cow” was known throughout baseball even to this day.

1.  Derek Jeter

Derek Jeter is the hands-down best New York Yankee shortstop ever.  This baby bomber spent his entire Hall of Fame career, 20 years with the Yankees all of them at shortstop. He is one of the very few career Yankees to have never played a game at another position at any time during their career.  Jeter was the most popular of all Yankees from the late ’90s to the present.  He was a member of the “Core four” that brought the Yankees to five World Series Championships.

After 20 years at short, he had the highest fielding percentage (.976) of any Yankee shortstop in the history of the club.  Add to that, Jeter was clutch at every important opportunity.  He hit an amazing batting average of .310, the eighth highest of any Yankee.  He led all Yankees playing 2,247 games while getting a historic 3,465 hits.  He was also number one with 544 doubles.

Getting back to Jeter being clutch, he had a unique ability to find himself in impact changing moments during the regular and postseason.  He seemed to relish it, although the shortstop was one of the most modest players always putting the team first.  A few examples include him getting his 3000th hit.  He didn’t just get a hit, he did it in style with a smashing home run.  When it came time for Jeter to retire in his last appearance at Yankee Stadium, he turned fantasy into reality when he hit the walk-off home run in his final game.

Jeter, during his career with the Yankees, was Rookie of the Year in 1996, he was an All-Star 14 times, a twelve-time MVP candidate, a five-time Gold Glove award winner, and a Silver Slugger award winner five times.  Jeter was one of those unique players that played consistently throughout his entire career and retired at the top of his game.  Jeter became the second Yankee shortstop to be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame to be inducted in the 2020 class.  He missed a unanimous vote by just one sour sportswriter.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=2xHpevdVa1U%3Ffeature%3Doembed

In selecting my top ten, I valued time with the club, performance as per Baseball-Reference.com.  Peak career performance and performance in postseason play was also a factor.  Special situations like changing career positions were also a consideration.

EmpireSportsMedia.com’s Columnist William Parlee is a member of the Society for American Baseball Research.

New York Yankee Top 10’s: The Yankees top base stealers

In my latest installment of the New York Yankee Top 10’s, we examine the best base stealers the Yankees have been blessed with in modern history. In my other top 10 articles, I have covered everything from top position players, pitchers, catchers, and more obscure top 10’s such as memorable moments in Yankees history and top 10 best seasons. Today we examine those unique players that run like the wind and become base stealing specialists.

Some players that were fast on the bases never became great base stealers. A good example is Billy Martin; he only stole 19 bases over seven years of play during his playing days with the Yankees. Other players that weren’t so fast on the base, like catcher Yogi Berra weren’t expected to steal many bases and didn’t. In his 19 years with the Yankees, he stole only 30 bases. Compare that to Derek Jeter; in his 20 years with the Yankees, he stole 358 bases. Fans don’t even like to hear the name of Jacoby Ellsbury, but in his short time with the Yankees, he stole 108 bases. An honorable mention has to go to Alfonso Soriano, who stole 130 bases for the Yankees, Bernie Williams for his 147 stolen bags. The “Scooter” Phil Rizzuto’s 149.

10. Horace Clarke– 151. Clark was a second baseman who probably is not known to many young Yankees fans, but he would steal 151 bases; he was only caught 58 times. Clarke had speed on the bases and was a decent player. However, he also has the distinction of never reaching the postseason in his ten-year career.

9. Roberto Kelly– 151. Kelly did not spend his entire career with the New York Yankees, but he stole 151 bases while a Yankee. In 1990 he stole his career-high 42 stolen bases. Unfortunately, he was with the Yankees for only four whole years. He was an All-Star in 1992. He was then traded to the Cincinnati Reds for outfielder Paul O’Neill. Over the life of his baseball career, he would steal 235 bases. He was lucky enough to be back with the Yankees in 2000, where he finished out his career playing ten games that year.

8. Alex Rodriguez – 152. Rodriguez was one of the best baseball players ever to play the game. He was a brilliant hitter and defender and continued that trend when he came to the New York Yankees, being just as good a hot corner defender when he changed from being a career-long shortstop. What many present-day Yankee fans don’t know is that he was an excellent base stealer. Few were ever more successful; he had an 84% success rate. While with the Yankees, he stole 152 bases. An 84-percent success rate is second for the Yankees all time. After hip surgery and as his time in the game waned, he was 24 for his last 27 attempts. A-Rod was one of the smartest Yankees base stealers ever. In his career with the Seattle Mariners, the Rangers, and the Yankees, he stole 329 bases and fell four home runs short of 700.

7. Mickey Mantle– 153. Mantle was known as a player that played through many injures and still hit 536 long balls. Many only know him from his 1961 race with Roger Maris for the most home runs of the season. Maris finally won with 61. But, not only was Mantle one of the best switch hitters over his career, but he was also an excellent base runner. In this Yankee career, he stole 153 bases. Many think the total would have been much higher if he hadn’t spent so much time trotting his home run trot. He was caught just 38 times.

6. Roy White 233. While playing and still today, Roy White is often overlooked for the fine baseball player he was, primarily due to some of the star players he played with. But White was a giant in his own right. Even though he didn’t hit many home runs, he was a consistent contact hitter with a career .271 batting average over his 15 years, all with the Yankees. He also was an excellent base runner, stealing 233 bases for the Yankees.

5. Hal Chase – 248. For most New York Yankee fans, Hal Chase is one of the more obscure Yankee players even though he played 15 years in the majors, mainly because it was 1905 to 1919. Chase stole an excellent 248 bases for the Yankees when base stealing was not widely known. He had a .291 career batting average, playing his best with the New York Yankees in the nine years.

4. Willie Randolph – 251. Willie Randolph hasn’t played for the Yankees in years, but you still hear his name frequently, mostly being in consideration for managing the Yankees. But, it is doubtful the talented second baseman ever will, being that he has been passed by twice already. The ever-popular Randolph had a career batting average in his 13 years with the Yankees of .275. He was a great contact hitter and drove in six short of 500 RBIs. He also was one of the best Yankee base stealers, stealing 251. That’s an average of about 20 per year.

3. Brett Gardner– 274. Of present-day New York Yankees, veteran Brett Gardner is the hands-down best Yankee base stealer, even though his stealing has waned in the last few years. He is still the best stealer over the previous six seasons. During his base-stealing prime between 2010 and 2011, he stole 96 bases. Even at age 38, few in the major league can compete with his wheels around the bases, and his 274 career stolen bases.

2. Ricky Henderson- 326. Whether to put Henderson or Jeter as the best Yankee base stealer was somewhat of a dilemma for me, but I decided to go with career stats with the Yankees and not most productive years. That said, know this, Ricky Henderson is the major league’s record holder for the most career bases stolen (1406). No one in baseball comes close to that and likely never will. However often overlooked is that during his four years with the Yankees, he was the most dominant base stealers the Yankees have ever seen. He had his best stealing years with the Yankees. Pitchers feared him as they knew if he got on base, he would probably steal.

1. Derek Jeter – 358. In his Yankee career, Derek Jeter broke many records; one of the most overlooked was he was one of the most consistent base stealers throughout his career. He stole 358 bases for the Yankees over his 20-year career. The Hall of Famer stole a career-high 32 bases in 2002 while only being caught three times. Well past his prime and in his last year in baseball in 2014, he stole ten bases, only being caught twice. Over his career, he had a 79% stealing success. Throughout his career, the Captain was one of the most reliable base stealers for the Yankees.

EmpireSportsMedia.com’s Columnist William Parlee is a member of the Society for American Baseball Research. Follow him on Twitter @parleewilliam.

New York Yankees top 10’s: Records that likely will never be broken

New York Yankees, Mariano Rivera

In the newest installment of my top 10 series, I examine New York Yankee and other baseball records that will likely never be broken. My other series examines top 10 pitchers, top 10 first baseman, and top ten Yankee moments in history among many other top tens. But today, we examine some of the outstanding players with outstanding records that will be very hard to break.

  1. The only player to be installed in the Hall of Fame, unanomously!

If Derek Jeter couldn’t be elected to the Hall of Fame, unanimously, it’s hard to believe anyone ever will be. But Mariano Rivera did it, and he did it in his first year of eligibility. Rivera is most often considered the best reliever of all time. Rivera, in his career, all with the New York Yankees he closed 1,115 games with 652 saves. That figure is 51 more saves than Trevor Hoffman, his closest contender.

2. With 2,632 consecutive games played, it’s a record that will not be duplicated!

This is a different time and a game that is played differently; players are constantly injured and given days off to rest. Cal Ripken’s feat is almost unbelievable. In 1995 Ripkin surpassed the Yankees Iron Horse Lou Gehrig’s 2,131 consecutive games played

3. The only perfect game in the postseason!

Don Larsen is the holder of a record that will likely not be broken. He is the only pitcher to have a perfect game in the World Series. The feat was completed in game 5 of the 1956 classic. Not only that, but there has never been a no-hitter in World Series history. Furthermore,Larsen’s record is one of the only two no-hitters in postseason history; the other was by Roy Halliday in 2010.

4. With 1,406 stolen bases, who will break that record?

Ricky Henderson, a former Yankee, played for several teams in his career. He was such a dangerous base stealer that pitchers knew he would try to steal almost every time he took base. Yet, in his remarkable entire career, he was caught stealing only 335 times. Strangely he doesn’t hold the same record for the postseason, that belongs to Kenny Lofton.

5. Who can beat Barry Bonds 762 home runs?

It’s hard to know who took steroids in the steroid era, but the fact is that most of those players were talented enough to play just as well out of the enhancement. It’s hard to tell how Barry Bond’s career would have turned out, but over his 22 years of major league play, he racked up 762 home runs. It has to be pointed out that he may only have used enhancing drugs in a couple of those years. The next closest to his record is Hank Aaron’s 755 accomplished in one more year of play.

6. Most pitching wins in a single season

In the modern era in 1904, the New York Yankee’s Jack Chesbro started 41 games in that single season, for a record that still stands today. Today there are 162 games in a season; in 1904 there were only 154 games. That means that Chesbro pitched all season long on 3.5 days of rest. No team would ever allow a pitcher to pitch regularly on less than five days’ rest, which is a reason that Chesbor’s name will be in the history book for a long time.

7. The most career hits 4,256

Pete Rose has more career hits than any player to play the game. The number he achieved is just 67 hits higher the the second place leader who was centerfielder, Ty Cob. To put it into perspective, Pete Rose’s record is 791 more hits than the 20 year career of Derek Jeter. Pete Rose would be a shoe in for induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame if it wasn’t for his betting on baseball. He has been banned for life. Many believe the ban should be lifted.

8. Most Career Postseason innings pitched

The winningest postseason pitcher in modern times is Andy Pettitte, he also has pitched the most innings in the postseason, a record that still stands today. Pettitte was19–10 with a 3.83 ERA and 173 strikeouts in the postseasons from 1995 to 2005. He has five World Series wins to his name.

9. The most career Postseason hits

The unlikely record to be broken is postseason hits, that belongs to Derek Jeter. He has 180 hits in the post season.

10. Who owns the most World Series rings?

The undisputed owner of the most World Series rings is Yogi Berra, Berra got rings for 10 World Series wins. Berra played for the Yankees from 1946-1965. In his remarkable career he was a 16 time MVP candidate winning the Award three times. Only Barry Bonds has more MVP wins.

Obviously, I could have picked dozens of other records, but these ten are among my favorites. Others are the most hits in a single season, 262, Ichiro Suzuki. Most complete games, 749, Cy Young. The longest hitting streak, 56 games, Joe DiMaggio. Most career World Series home runs, 18, Mickey Mantle, and the list goes on and on. For more wonderful baseball records, go here

New York Yankees: Today, Derek Jeter entered the Baseball Hall of Fame

New York Yankees, Derek Jeter

It’s September 8, 2021, the day that New York Yankees‘ shortstop Derek Jeter was finally inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame albeit delayed by the coronavirus.  After an illustrious 20 years with the Yankees and hundreds of accolades throughout his career, but the ultimate reward for an exceptional career is induction into the Hall of fame, today he joined that esteemed community.

Between 1:30 and 2 pm, all of the present Hall of Famers were introduced, followed by this year’s inductees: Marvin Miller, Ted Simmons, Larry Walker, and finally Derek Jeter to the roar of the crowd and the chant of Derek Jeter, Derek Jeter. That was followed by a wonderful rendition of the National Anthem led by Bernie Williams on guitar. Next, Joe Torre introduced a video produced to honor 10 fallen members of the Hall since the 2019 induction.

After the other inductees were introduced and made their speeches, a video was played on the remarkable career of Derek Jeter. Then Jeter was asked to receive his Hall of Fame Plaque. Baseball Commissioner Bob Manfred read the inscription on his plaque.

At 3:48 in Cooperstown, New York, Derek Jeter stepped to the podium. In typical Jeter style, he would rather talk about his fellow inductees and those that came before him rather than his own accomplishments. First, he congratulated his fellow inductees, the Hall of Fame staff, and the writer’s “all but one of them,” Jeter quipped. Next, he spoke of playing 20 years with the only team he ever wanted to play for, the New York Yankees. Next, he talked about the importance of family and his dad in his career. Finally, he spoke and thanked all those members of his family who made him who he was and is today.

He spoke of Dick Groch, who first saw Jeter play, he was the scout that said this man will see Cooperstown. He read of many names that he should thank players, coaches to the front office for their help in his development. He thanked Joe Torre and Joe Girardi for their trust in him. He thanks a host of players. He thanked the “Boss” Goerge Steinbrenner and the entire Steinbrenner family. Next, he thanked the New York Yankee fans. He said he lived a dream and is still living it. Finally, he thanked his wife and children and how much he loved them.

He concluded by saying that this is a game of failure to today’s players; he asked that those players respect the game as he has. Not once in his speech did he speak of any individual accomplishment that got him to the Hall of Fame; how fitting!

There is no better time to look back at Derek Jeters’ most memorable moments with the New York Yankees with Jeter’s induction. Although these moments may be biased as a lifelong Yankee fan, they are my 10 most memorable moments of his career.

10. Jeter’s Jeffery Maier Home Run

Under the category of taking it when you can get it, Jeter benefited from a young boy in the stands.  It was the 1996 ALCS against the Orioles. That young boy was Jeffery Maier, surely he didn’t know it at the time, but his Derek Jeter catch or knock into the stands would go down in baseball history.  Umpire Richie Garcia would call it a home run tying the game.  The New York Yankees would win the game 5-4 with a Bernie Williams walk-off homer.

9.  Derek’s Opening Day 1996

Before opening day in 1996 owner, George M. Steinbrenner wasn’t sure Jeter should be the opening day shortstop.  After all, just a few months early, he almost traded him to the Mariners.  He was only 21 and a scrawny kid that had had problems with his defense in spring training.  So what did Jeter do? He made spectacular plays and got a homer in the win against Cleveland on opening day.  The next day he would go 3-3 and stole bases.  In those two games, Jeter turned heads in what would be a Hall of Fame career, all with the Yankees.

8. The 5 for 5 in the Division opener

During 2006 in the Division Series against the Detroit Tigers, a series the Yankees would like to forget.  The Tigers took the ALDS from the Yankees in four games.  But in the only game the Yankees won, game one, Derek Jeter went 5-5, including two doubles and a home run while scoring three runs. It would be one of only three games in his career where he would get 10 RBIs.

7. Jeter is All-Star and World Series MVP

In 2000 Jeter put his hame into the history books by becoming the only player in the game’s history to be both All-Star and World Series MVP in the same season.  That record still stands today.

6. Derek Jeter’s 3,000th hit

Like so many great Yankee players, Jeter hit many home runs, but he was also a hitting king.  In a comeback year, Jeter was hitting .331, but his signature moment was when he hit his 3,000th hit.  On July 9, 2011, he hit number 3,000 off Rays’ ace David Price.  He wasn’t done in the same game. He had a total of five hits and went 5-5.  Jeter always reached milestones with style increasing his mystique.

5. Jeter’s World Series leadoff homer

In the first subway World series since 1956, the Yankees would take game one in twelve innings. They would survive a comeback and take game two. Moving to the Queens in games 3 and 4, the Mets would win game 3.  In game four, Manager Joe Torres moved Jeter from his familiar hitting spot to lead off.  Jeter launched a home run off Mets starter Bobby Jones into the left-field bleachers at Shea.  The New York Yankees would win the game and ultimately the series with Jeter being named MVP.

4. Jeter becomes Mr. November

Years before, Reggie Jackson was nicknamed “Mr. October” for his clutch hitting in the postseason with the Dodgers and the Yankees. After hitting two home runs in the first five games of the World Series in 1977, Jackson hit three home runs in game six, and the Yankees would win their first World Series in fifteen years. 

Derek Jeter was named Mister November with me in the stands during the ALCS of 2001.  In the tenth inning of a tied game against the Diamondbacks, Jeter came to the plate just as the clock struck midnight, marking the first time Major League Baseball had been played in November.  Byung-Hyun Kim was on the mound pitching. Jeter then hit Kim’s ninth pitch of the at-bat just over Yankee Stadium’s short rightfield wall for a game-winning and Series-tying home run. It was the first walk-off home run of Jeter’s career.  From then on, Jeter was known as Mr. November.

3. Derek Jeter’s flip

Many call it the most fantastic play in baseball. It was the 2001 American League Division Series against the A’s, and the New York Yankees were facing elimination in Oakland in Game 3. Jorge Posada hit a solo home run off Zito in the top of the fifth, and the Yankees carried that 1-0 lead into the bottom of the seventh in what would be a pitching duel between Zito and the Yankees’ Mike Mussina.

With slow-footed Jason Giambi on third, Terrence Long doubled, and the third base coach signaled that Giambi should take off for home.  Shane Spencer threw an off-line throw to cut of Giambi.  Giambi’s attempt to reach home plate seemed a surety. Instead, the ball went just past the first baseline, but Jeter seemingly popped up out of nowhere to scoop up the ball and flip it to catcher Jorge Posada to catch Giambi by a split second and get the out that would seal the deal on the Yankee 1-0 win.

2. Derek Jeter flies into the stands

Derek Jeter flew into the New York Yankee Stadium fan’s arms with no regard for his own safety.  Trot Nixon popped up down the left-field line in the 12th inning of a tied game against the Red Sox. Derek Jeter, in a dead sprint from his shortstop position, made an over-the-shoulder catch. He had so much momentum that he launched himself over the railing and ended up two rows deep. He emerged with a cut on his chin and blood running from his cheek.  Team trainer Gene Monahan, manager Aaron Boone, and Alex Rodriguez helped Jeter off the field with his parents shocked in the stands. The Yankees went on to win the game in the bottom of the 13th inning on a John Flaherty single.

1. Derek Jeter’s walk-off goodbye to Yankee Stadium.

On the last day, Jeter faced dozens of reporters in the locker room.  All they wanted was for Jeter to talk about his career, something he always hated to do, somehow; he slipped away to a private area, but when he returned, the number of reporters had more than doubled. So Jeter finally relented and said:

“The only thing I’ve ever wanted to talk about is winning,” Jeter said. “When there’s particular attention on you, as opposed to the team, it can be uncomfortable. But I understand it, and I appreciate it.”

Jeter took to the field for a pregame ceremony a few minutes before 7 p.m., and following that, a video was played on the center-field video board in which several fans — young and old — thanked Jeter for his years with the Yankees. At the end of the video, Jeter reciprocated, thanking the fans. Then, when Jeter appeared on the board, the crowd roared with applause.

Nothing was more like Derek Jeter than his final game at Yankee Stadium.  It was as if it was a perfectly choreographed game to show off Derek Jeter as the man of the moment he was throughout so much of his career.  Setting the stage, it was Derek Jeter’s last game at New York Yankee Stadium; his parents were in the stands as they were in many important moments in their son’s career.  The game was tied 5-5 in the bottom of the ninth inning against the Baltimore Orioles.

What Jeter and his fans didn’t know was that Jeter’s memorable moments weren’t finished; it was about to get emotional and magical.  Richardson was on first base; Brett Gardner hit a sac fly to center advancing Richardson to second. The game was tied at 5. Then, in his last at-bat in a game that would probably go into extra innings, Jeter stepped to the plate. The eternally patrician Bob Sheppard over the public address announced “number two, Derek Jeter, number two.” The crowd was cheering Der-Ek-Jet-er, Der-Ek-Jet-er. Jeter would go after the first pitch he saw and smack a walk-off single and win for the Yankees in his very last game at Yankee Stadium.  Jeter, who seldom showed emotion, realized he had won the game with a massive smile across his face and raised arms as his teammates swamped him.

It’s moments like this. The Yankees make tears stream down my face.  It happened when I learned Thurmon had died when George obviously ill, handed out the ball at the All-Star Game when Bobby died when Yogi died when Mariano lost it on the mound when Derek and Andy took the ball from him that one last time, and when Derek said goodby with a walk-off win. I can’t help it; I love my Yankees.

After the game Manager, Joe Torres would sum up Jeter’s career perfectly. “What he represents, we don’t have enough of in sports; I’m not just talking about his ability to play baseball, but also what he represents as a man. Sports will cry out for more people as respectful as Derek Jeter.”

Several years later, Jeter’s love of baseball would allow him to be a part-owner and operations manager of the Miami Marlins. He stays today, but now as a National Baseball Hall of Famer.

New York Yankees: This week in Yankee history (video)

There probably isn’t a day that goes by that something in New York Yankee history hasn’t happened that is memorable in their 109-year history. So here is a look at this week’s happenings in that history. This week is particularly interesting.

July 4th, 1925:

On this Independence Day, Yankee pitcher Herb Pennock and the Athletics pitcher Lefty Grove had a game for the history books. The game went 15 innings, with the Yankees winning 1-0. Pennock had one bad pitch in the game. He struck out the first 18 in a row he faced and the last 21 in a row—quite a pitcher’s duel.

July 4th, 1932:

New York Yankee catch Bill Dickey punched Carl Reynolds in the face causing a double fractured jaw. Dickey was suspended for 30 days. It all happened after the Yankees lost the first game of the doubleheader 5-3. In the second game, Joe Sewell threw a ball to home with Reynolds on his way. The ball and Reynold arrive simultaneously, resulting in the collision. Dickey wouldn’t have it and popped him one; that is still a historical event talked about today.

July 4th, 1939:

In 1939 on Independence Day, Lou Gehrig delivered his famed address to the crowd at Yankee Stadium. The “I am the luckiest man in the world” speech is still one of the most iconic in all of baseball. But, unfortunately, Gehrig would die almost two years after his speech of  amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, often called “Lou Gehrig disease.”

July 4th, 1960:

The famous Yankee Micky Mantle celebrated independence day by hitting the 300th home run of his career.

July 4th, 1983:

Legendary Yankees pitcher Dave Righetti got the first Yankee no-hitter since Don Larsen’s perfect game in the 1956 World Series. Righetti celebrated on the mound after no-hitting the Yankee’s most intense rival, Boston Red Sox. He was also the first lefty pitcher to do it since 1917 when George Mogridge accomplished the feat against the same Boston Red Sox. It was the first Yankee no-hitter for the young New York Yankees.

 

July 6th, 1941:

The New York Yankees dedicate a monument in center field to the last Lou Gehrig, honoring their deceased captain. Gehrig had died of ALS just a month earlier.

July 7th, 1937:

It was the All-Star Game, the fourth ever. Famous Yankee first baseman Lou Gehrig drove in four runs in the game with a homer and double. The American League beat the National League 8-3. It was the first time a U.S. President attended an All-Star game. Franklin Roosevelt threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

July 9th, 1937:

Yankee slugger Joe DiMaggio hit for the cycle, hitting two home runs, a triple, double and single in a win over the Washington Senators. He would hit for the cycle again in 1948.

July 10th, 1914:

At the time, the Yankees were playing at the polo grounds in New York City. The polo grounds had no lighting. The Yankees won the second game of a doubleheader with only one hit. The game had to be postponed due to darkness. The Yankee would never win another by just one hit until 2016 against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field.

July 10th, 2001:

Derek Jeter hit the first Yankee home run in an All-Star game in 42 years. The last to do it was Yogi Berra in 1959.

 

 

Yankees’ legend Derek Jeter and the 2020 class will have Hall induction ceremony in September with ‘limited’ crowds

New York Yankees, Derek Jeter

The Hall of Fame Class of 2020, led by New York Yankees’ shortstop Derek Jeter, couldn’t enjoy an induction ceremony last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, fans who want to see their idols immortalized will have their chance to do it in person this year.

Jane Forbes Clark, the Chairman of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, announced today that this summer’s Induction Ceremony will take place at 1:30 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Sept. 8. According to a note published in the Baseball Hall of Fame website, the event will be ‘in front of limited crowds as an outdoor ticketed event’.

For those who want to see it in TV, the ceremony will be broadcast live exclusively on MLB Network.

The Yankees’ longtime shortstop is set for immortality

The Yankees’ legendary shortstop was elected to the Hall in early 2020, and was a vote shy of unanimity. Marvin Miller, Ted Simmons and Larry Walker will also be inducted to the Hall this summer as part of the 2020 class. No players were selected in 2021.

“On behalf of our Board of Directors and our Staff, we are thrilled to be able to welcome our Hall of Famers – the living legends – and fans back to Cooperstown to celebrate the Induction of the Class of 2020,” Clark said. “Returning the Induction Ceremony to an outdoor event will provide the baseball community with the opportunity to visit Cooperstown and celebrate the Induction of four of the game’s Greats.”

In the past, lawn seating was unrestricted, but this time it will require tickets. Those tickets will be made available starting on July 12.

Roughly 55,000 fans attended the 2019 induction ceremony, but that is unrealistic under the current COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent health and safety guidelines.

Yankees fans who want to see Jeter, a five-time World Series champion with the Bombers, enter the Hall of Fame right at the venue will have their opportunity.

New York Yankees: This week in Yankee history, Goodbye Babe, Hello Derek

New York Yankees, Yankees, Derek Jeter

There probably isn’t a day that goes by that something in New York Yankee history hasn’t happened that is memorable in their 109-year history. Here is a look at this week’s happenings in that history.

1997, May 29th:

On this day, the New York Yankees acquired Hideki Irabu from the San Diego Padres. It turned out to be one of the worst trades ever made by the Yankees. He was 29-20 over four years. The only problem was that when he was acquired, he was supposed to be the new Yankee ace. That obviously didn’t come close to working out.

2002, May 29th:

Yankee pitcher Roger Clemens becomes the third pitcher in the majors to have 10 or more strikeouts in at least 100 games pitched. The other two were Nolan Ryan and Randy Johnson.

1938, May 30th:

On this day, the Yankees had record attendance. It was Memorial Day and a doubleheader for the Yankees against the Boston Red Sox. The Yankees sweep the Red Sox in front of a crowd of 81 841 packed into the Stadium. It’s a record that will never be beaten. The new Stadium only has a capacity of 54,341.

1938, May 31st:

Lou Gehrig played his 2,000th consecutive game in a win over the Boston Red Sox. Gehrig would play another 130 games before ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) ended his Yankee career.

2009, June 1st:

The New York Yankees created a record that has not been broken to this day. They played 18 consecutive games without committing an error. The following day Jorge Posada would throw a bullet out into centerfield when trying to gun down a base stealer.

1935 June 2nd:

Former Yankee pitcher and slugger Babe Ruth announces his retirement from baseball.

1941, June 2nd:

The New York Yankees arrived in Detroit to play a series against the Tigers. Upon their arrival, they found out that Yankee Captain Lou Gehrig has passed away in this sleep from ALS. It was just 17  days before his 38th birthday. Ironically it was 16 years ago exactly that he made the Yankee major league lineup.

1932, June 3rd:

Playing the Philadelphia Athletics, the Yankees’ Lou Gehrig becomes the first player in the modern era to hit four home runs in the same game. The Yankees won the slugfest 20-13 and scored a record 50 bases in the game.

1998, June 3rd:

After escaping Cuba only six months earlier, Orlando Hernandez “El Duque” got his first Yankee win.  He defeated the Tampa Bay Devil Rays 7-1 in front of an adoring Yankees crowd at Yankee Stadium.

2003, June 3rd:

Derek Jeter was named the 11th captain of the New York Yankees. He would go on to being one of the best players in the game. He would play another 13 years for the Yankees. He was a 14-time American League All-Star and was sixth all-time with 3,645 career hits. He spent all 20 years of his career with the Yankees.

 

 

 

Yankees legend Derek Jeter will have his documentary: ‘The Captain’ will be ready in 2022

New York Yankees, Yankees, Derek Jeter

For New York Yankees’ fans, watching Derek Jeter play and proudly wear the pinstripes with class and dignity was a joy for almost two full decades. He certainly wasn’t the most feared power hitter of all, but mastered the art of putting the bat to the ball, going the other way, and had a penchant for the dramatic.

ESPN, like all of us, thinks Jeter’s career is worthy of global admiration, and announced that it will be producing a documentary about the Yankees’ legend (link to NJ Advance Media article here).

The New York Post’s Andrew Marchand was the one that broke the news Tuesday on Twitter. “ESPN working with Derek Jeter on a doc about him, called, “The Captain” was the message he wrote on his account.

The Captain will be a 6-part TV documentary, and will be ready for people to enjoy it in 2022. Yankees fans all over the world will be able to relive the on-field legacy that Jeter managed to build as a core performer in the dynasty that won four World Series titles in a span of five years between 1996 and 2000.

The Yankees’ shortstop was in a class of his own

The Yankees’ eternal number 2 announced his retirement from baseball after the 2014 season was finished. He called it quits with 3,465 career hits, an amazing number for a shortstop and one that ranks sixth in the all-time list.

His career was spent with the Yankees, and in his 20 years with the team, he won multiple accolades, most notably five World Series (1996, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2009), 14 All-Star games, five Gold Glove awards, and five Silver Slugger awards.

He made his long-awaited return to MLB in 2017, but as a CEO and part-owner of the Miami Marlins, a role that maintains to this day.

He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2020, and was a vote short of being the second unanimous selection after his longtime Yankees teammate Mariano Rivera.

New York Yankees Top 10’s: Is your favorite shortstop among the top 10? (videos)

New York Yankees, Derek Jeter

The New York Yankees, in their 107-year glorious history, have had their share of great baseball players.  From Babe Ruth to Joe DiMaggio to Ron Guidry, Derek Jeter, and dozens more, some of the best baseball players in history have graced Yankee Stadium.  In my other top ten columns, I’ve dealt with the other positions. In this installment, I will attempt to identify the great Yankee shortstops.  With so many great shortstops, some writers will differ in the order of their preferences.  Here are this writer’s top 10.

One through five is relatively easy; beyond that gets more difficult as the New York Yankees are more known for their outfielders, 2nd and 3rd baseman. If the Yankees have a weakest position in their history, it is probably at shortstop. Also, the Yankees have had players known for their offense and defense of their positions, but they were more well know at another position. A good example is Alex Rodgriguez, one of the top five shortstops in all of the baseball lore, but he played 3rd base for the Yankees. Joe Sewell, the Hall of Fame shortstop, could have been included in this list, but I did not consider him as he only played two years for the Yankees.

10.  Tom Tresh

First, let me say about Tom Tresh that he would have been in the top five except that he played more in the New York Yankee Stadium outfield than in short. Tresh played nine years for the Yankees with a career batting average of .247 with 140 home runs, five seasons with 20 or more, while being an excellent defender both short and in the outfield.

9. Gene Michael

Gene Michael was valuable to the New York Yankees as a player, coach, manager, and front office.  He was as responsible for the last ’90s, 2000’s Yankee dynasty as anyone in the organization. Michael started his seven-year stint with the Yankees in 1968. He was not known as a hitter and less so as a long ball hitter.  What he was known for was his excellent defense at short.  He is another Yankee that could have ranked higher on this list if his offense was in line with his defense.

8. Mark Koenig

Many present-day fans don’t know Mark Koenig; he played for the Yankees for six years, starting in 1925.  Koenig was an excellent hitter for that time, hitting .285.  He was not a home run hitter but hit for contact.  In 1928 he hit .319 for the season.   He was agile at short and played 2nd and 3rd when needed.  In 1927 he had third-most assists at shortstop in all of baseball (423).  In the World Series that the Yankees lost that year, he hit .500 without any errors in 28 chances.

7. Kid Elberfeld

Kid Elberfeld is another Yankee that few fans don’t remember.  He played short for the New York Yankees between 1903 and 1909.  In his seven years, he averaged .268 with 28 home runs.  As with many players at that time, he played all infield positions except for the 1st base.  His fielding average was .938, which was excellent for shortstops at that time.

6. Bucky Dent

Some may say that Bucky Dent should be further down this list or not on it it all.  I place him sixth due to his exceptional spotlight play in the 1978 one-game playoff with the Red Sox. Dent hit .239 while with the Yankees and was an All-Star twice, mostly because of his defense.  Dent was primarily known as a clutch contact hitter hitting 518 hits as a Yankee.

5. Frank Crosetti

Frank Crosetti is my choice as the 5th best Yankee shortstop.  Crosetti played his entire 17-year career with the Yankees, which brings him up on the list substantially. He hit .245 with over a thousand runs scored.  He was a two-time All-Star and a three-time MVP candidate.  Crosetti started his career at short for the Yankees in 1932, a position he held until a poor season in 1940 when Hall of Famer Phil Rizzuto took over for him.  But he retook the job when Rizzuto left for the Navy. Rizzuto rejoined the club in  1946. Crosetti then became a player/coach for the club when he retired in 1948.  He had a .948 fielding percentage as a Yankee

4. Roger Peckinpaugh

Roger Peckinpaugh was a Yankee for nine years and was an MVP candidate in 1914 when he was a player/manager.  He is the only one on the list to have managed the Yankees. He had a .949 fielding average while with the Yankees, which was quite good for that era.  He had a .259 batting average over the span.  He was known as a contact hitter with the ability to steal bases.  He stole 38 in 1914.  In 1921 Peckinpaugh led all of baseball with the most assists in one game (9).  After leaving the Yankees, he had a long managerial career ending with the Indians in 1941.  He later became general manager and president of the Indians.

3. Tony Kubek

Tony Kubek was one of the most beloved New York Yankees. He played 9 years with the Yankees. In 1957 he won the Rookie of the Year award.  He played from 1957 to 1965.  He was an All-Star four times and was an MVP candidate three times.  Kubek is the first utility player to make the list, and although he played all over the field, 80% of his games were played at short, which is where he won all his awards.  The only position that Kubek did not play for the Yankees is that of pitcher or catcher.  In Game Seven of the 1960 World Series, he bungled a double play when he was hit in the throat by a bad hop that knocked him out.  At short, he had an excellent .967 fielding percentage.

2.  Phil Rizzuto

Known as much for his career in broadcasting and his onfield play at short. Rizutto can not be overlooked as one of the best Yankee shortstops ever. The “Scooter” had a .968 fielding percentage at short in his 13 Yankee seasons.  Rizzuto was of small stature, and the manager at the time that Rizzuto made his major league debut in 1941, Joe McCarthy once said Rizzuto was too small to be a good baseball player.  History has shown that McCarthy was very wrong.  In 13 years, he had a fielding percentage of .968.  He hit .273 over the life of his career, with almost 1,600 hits over the span.  Rizzuto, the five-time All-Star, was an MVP candidate eight times, capturing the award in 1950.  Rizzuto was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. When he left the Yankees in 1956, he had over 1200 double-plays under his belt.

He contributed to seven Yankee World Series championships and is sixth all-time in World Series games played, eighth in hits with 45, fourth in walks with 30, and tied for third in stolen bases with 10. Rizzuto would have an exceptional 40 years broadcasting on radio and TV for the New York Yankees.  His folksy style embraced him to the Yankee fans.  His signature “Holy Cow” was known throughout baseball even to this day.

1.  Derek Jeter

Derek Jeter is the hands-down best New York Yankee shortstop ever.  This baby bomber spent his entire Hall of Fame career, 20 years with the Yankees, all of them at shortstop. He is one of the very few career Yankees to have never played a game at another position during their career.  Jeter was the most popular of all Yankees from the late ’90s to the present.  He was a member of the “Core four” that brought the Yankees to five World Series Championships.

After 20 years at short, he had the highest fielding percentage (.976) of any Yankee shortstop in the club’s history.  Add to that, Jeter was clutch at every important opportunity.  He hit an amazing batting average of .310, the eighth highest of any Yankee.  He led all Yankees, playing 2,247 games while getting a historic 3,465 hits.  He was also number one with 544 doubles.

Getting back to Jeter being clutch, he had a unique ability to find himself in impact-changing moments during the regular and postseason.  Although the shortstop was one of the most modest players, always putting the team first, he seemed to relish it.  A few examples include him getting his 3000th hit.  He didn’t just get a hit; he did it in style with a smashing home run.  When it came time for Jeter to retire in his last appearance at Yankee Stadium, he turned “fantasy into reality”[1] when he hit the walk-off home run in his final game.

During his career with the Yankees, Jeter was Rookie of the Year in 1996; he was an All-Star 14 times, a twelve-time MVP candidate, a five-time Gold Glove award winner, and a Silver Slugger award winner five times.  Jeter was one of those unique players that played consistently throughout his entire career and retired at the top of his game.  Jeter became the second Yankee shortstop to be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame to be inducted into the 2020 class.  He missed a unanimous vote by just one sour sportswriter. Originally scheduled for July 2020, with coronavirus concerns, the induction ceremony has been moved to this July 25th at Cooperstown, New York.