New York Yankees Top 10s: The best modern era Yankee acquisitions

In my New York Yankees top 10 series that has covered most aspects of Yankee baseball, today we look at the top 10 acquisitions in the modern era.  These acquisitions come from both signings and trades.  The Yankees have had many star players that were homegrown and had to look outside their farm system to fill various needs.  Owner George M. Steinbrenner was the first owner to make big moves and set the tone for acquisitions for the future.

This has been the most difficult to complete top 10s so far.  Many will disagree with the placements; however, with the Yankees now looking to acquire players to improve the team, it seemed appropriate to examine these past acquisitions. Keep in mind that many of the Yankees’ best players were not acquisitions.

10. Ricky Henderson

Henderson was one of the longest-tenured players, playing for 25 years, 5 of them with the Yankees.  During his five years, he stole 326 bases, making him the all-time base stealer for the Yankees. He hit .288 and had 78 home runs during the span while having an excellent fielding percentage in all outfield areas.  He was an All-Star every year; he was a New York Yankee.

9. CC Sabathia

CC Sabathia was instrumental in the Yankees winning their last World Series in 2009.  Sabathia came to the Yankees from the Milwaukee Brewers. In his eleven years with the Yankees, he had a record of 134 and 88.  During the Yankees’ years, he was a workhorse, always giving his best effort for a win.

8. Masahiro Tanaka

Brian Cashman brought Masahiro Tanaka to the Yankees from the Eagles of the Japanese league in 2013 in a seven-year contract that will end this season, whether there is one or not. During his time with the Yankees up to this year, he is 75-45 with a 3.75 ERA. Tanaka has never had a losing season with the Yankees.

7. David Wells

The highlight of David Wells’s career was his perfect game on May 17, 1998, the tenth no-hitter in Yankee history.  Wells for the Yankees was 34-14 in his two-year stint; that’s a .706 winning percentage, one of the best for the Yankees. Wells pitched 21 years, all in the American League.

Wells was quite a character that didn’t care much for rules.  He has admitted he pitched his perfect game while nursing a bad hangover. In 1998 he would help the Yankees with his 18-4 record and propelled them to the World Series shut out of the San Diego Padres.

6. Reggie Jackson

Yankee owner George M. Steinbrenner made Reggie Jackson the highest-paid baseball player when he hired Jackson from the Baltimore Orioles. However, Jackson was a controversial player as he was a show-off, and Manager Billy Martin didn’t want the Yankees to hire him.  It didn’t help when he was quoted as saying, “I’m the straw that stirs the drink,” a phrase that he never said but caused a rift with Yankee catcher Thurmon Munson.

In his five years with the Yankees, Jackson had many memorable moments, including his three home runs that caused him to be called “Mr. October.” In 1977 in the sixth game of the World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, New York Yankees outfielder Reggie Jackson hit three home runs off three consecutive pitches from three different pitchers. Jackson batted .284 with 144 home runs while a Yankee.

5. Mike Mussina

On this list, Mike Mussina is the one player that often flew under the radar. Mussina, after being a Baltimore Oriole star pitcher, became a New York Yankee.  He never had a losing season in his eight years with the Yankees, winning 10 or more games every year.  Mussina was not only an outstanding pitcher, but he was an excellent defender as any pitcher ever to grace the mound.

On some writer’s top 10 lists, they don’t even include Mussina.  For the Yankees, Mr. Steady is one of the Yankee’s most dependable pitchers during his time with the Yankees.  The brilliant Stanford grad, with a thinking pitcher that adjusted to every situation.  His performance never diminished with age. In the last year of his career, he had his first 20 win season, becoming the oldest pitcher to have a 20 win season.

He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum for his pitching with the Baltimore Orioles and the New York Yankees on January 22, 2019; he was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, receiving 76.71% of the vote.  Mike distinguishes being the first American League pitcher to win ten or more games in each of 17 consecutive seasons.

4. Alex Rodriguez

Alex Rodriguez is a controversial New York Yankee, to say the least.  Many fans cite his performance-enhancing drugs while with the Texas Rangers and ignore his Yankee club performance. But the facts are still the facts.  During his 22 years playing the game, he was one of the best in either league.

For his 12 years with the Yankees, he hit 30 home runs a year, with 1,100 RBIs while hitting .283. He was a seven-time All-Star and a seven-time MVP candidate, winning the prestigious award twice.  He would be a first-ballot inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame if it were not for his drug use, which most likely will never come to fruition.

I have to admit that I am a writer that does not place as much importance on drug use as many writers do.  My stance is that dozens of other players used some doping during that period that was never caught; thus, many stats may be in question. However, in the case of Rodriguez, his career wouldn’t have been less impressive even if he hadn’t made the bad decision to break the rules.

3. Paul O’Neill

Paul O’Neil played for only two teams in his baseball career, nine years with the Yankees in the second half of his career. Then, at the end of the 1992 season, the Red traded O’Neill outright for Yankee outfielder Roberto Kelly. In his first year, he batted .311 with 20 home runs and 75 RBIs.  O’Neill played with such vigor that owner George M. Steinbrenner would give him the nickname the “Warrior,” which stuck.

In his second year, he got the AL batting title batting .359.  If O’Neill missed a hit he thought he should have gotten, batting racks and water coolers often felt his wrath.  Stick Michael made the trade that would change the face of the Yankees for years to come.  Paul made amazing plays in defending the right field. He played fiercely and hurt; he was the ultimate warrior the Yankee fans loved.

2. Roger Clemens

The acquisition of Roger Clemens was one of the best the New York Yankees ever made. In 1996 the Yankees sent Graeme Lloyd, David Wells, and Homer Bush to the Toronto Blue Jays for their ace pitcher Clemens. In his first year with the Yankees, he helped them win the 1999 World Series. In 2000 he almost single-handedly retook them to the World Series with his 20-3 season.  The Yankees would win that series as well. Clemens was never fully embraced by Yankee fans due to his long tenure with the Boston Red Sox.

Also, in 2000, Roger would win the prestigious Cy Young Award at the age of 38.  Roger is one of the longer-tenured pitchers in baseball, pitching for 24 years.  With the Yankees, he would win twice as many games as he lost.  He went 83-42 in his six years with the Yankees for a .664 winning percentage.  It is outrageous that this 3 time Cy Young Award isn’t in the Hall of Fame.  This year he received 72.5% of the votes compared to the 75% needed to be inducted.  He has two years left of eligibility.

1. Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth isn’t a modern era Yankee acquisition but must be included in the list as the best move the Yankees ever made in procuring him from the cash-strapped Boston Red Sox.  Following Ruth becoming a Yankee, he transformed himself into a great hitting outfielder. He really made his name with the Yankees as one of the best if not the best player to ever play baseball.

Honorable mentions:

David Cone, Starky Lyle, Roger Maris, Tino Martinez, Scott Brosius, Curtis Granderson, and Nick Swisher.

Gerrit Cole could not be included for the Yankee top 10s as he hasn’t had a long enough time or games thrown to prove he belongs on this list. However, he has to be mentioned as he may be in the future proclaimed one of the best Yankee acquisitions in history; only time will tell. The same goes for DJ LeMahieu and Gio Urshela; how they play will tell if they can be included on this list in the coming years.

EmpireSportsMedia.com’s Columnist William Parlee is a member of the Society for American Baseball Research.  Follow me on Twitter @parleewilliam.

Baseball’s Hall of Fame Needs To Fix Their Selection Process

Tuesday marked the ninth time no players were selected into Baseball’s Hall of Fame since the first class was inducted back in 1936. The BBWAA also set a record with 14 blank ballots because of the controversial Curt Schilling and steroid tied candidates.

Baseball is the only Hall of Fame among the four major sports where only the writers are the judge, the jury, and the executioner. This flawed process allowed writers with bruised or exacerbated egos to severely damage the voting process’s integrity.

Election rules state, “Voting shall be based upon the player’s record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character, and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played.” Some voters stick to the rules provided while others insert “did I like him?” to the end of that sentence. This year’s fiasco heightens the need for change in the selection process.

By no means is this a rebellion against the writers, considering that I fall into the same category. The issue is that people who never spent a day playing, coaching, or working in the front office of a Major League Baseball team hold the fate of all-time great players in their pens. 

If writers do not have egos, then explain why Ken Griffey Jr., Derek Jeter, or Greg Maddux never got 100% of the vote or why certain biases against first-ballot players exist?

Enlist a Committee

It is not a matter of kicking writers off the vote; it is about bringing in the perspective of people who had to play and manage against the considered players. Committees already exist for separate eras, but it should encompass the entire Hall of Fame. The other three major sports use a committee filled with writers, executives, Hall of Famers, and other experts in their respective sports.

Earning a spot on these committees is a thorough process and eliminated the current situation in baseball. Plenty of current voters do not deserve their vote, and plenty of former players have different opinions that would allow deserving players to get their moment in Cooperstown.

Holding a vote from Schilling is reasonable due to his support for a terrorist attack on the U.S. Capitol. There are plenty of gray areas for the rest of the ballot. It has been a struggle for “steroid era” players to enter the Hall even though MLB did not implement PED testing until 2004.

Bud Selig was the commissioner during this era and did next to nothing to solve the problem quickly. Selig got his day in Cooperstown, while the players who kept baseball alive might not get theirs. During Selig’s era, taking steroids was as normal as drinking Gatorade in between innings. Even players who did not have the special talents of the potential Hall of Famers were juicing.

It is impossible to describe baseball’s past without these names in the Hall of Fame. When they are enshrined, the steroid conversation does not fade away. It will never be engraved on their plaques, but it will always be attached to their names. Post-2004 abusers like Alex Rodriguez and Robinson Cano deserve to miss out on enshrinement. They tested positive in an era where mainstream cheating comes in the form of technology.

Players See The Game Differently

Most players and managers would tell you Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens belong in the Hall. If you are against steroid users, ask about Billy Wagner or Jeff Kent; you would get the same results. Instead, all four of them, along with much more, are polling at numbers that will keep them out for the rest of their time on the ballot.

There are plenty of great media members who deserve to keep their vote, but others have egos as large as the players they despise. Some voters are not even covering the sport at the moment. Replacing media members with other baseball voices will bring back lost integrity from the most historic and illustrious sports Hall of Fame.

New York Yankees: No Yankees elected to the Hall of Fame, but they weren’t alone

No New York Yankees player was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, but those Yankee players weren’t alone. For the first time since 2013, no player this year received the honor of being enshrined with other baseball greats. Results were announced Tuesday night by Hall of Fame president Tim Mead, and none of the 24 candidates made it. There were 401 ballots cast, although 14 sportswriters turned in empty ballots. Here is how the Yankee candidates made out.

BOBBY ABREU, RF

Abreu played for the Yankees only three years between 2006 and 2008. He was on the ballot for the second time and received 8.7% of the votes. For the Yankees, he batted .295 with 43 home runs. His best years were with the Philadephia Phillies. The closest he came to an MVP was in 2009 with the Los Angeles Angels.

A.J. BURNETT, RHP

Unfortunately for Burnett, he was on the ballot for the first time but received no votes (0 of 401) and will not be a candidate next year. A player must get at least 5% of the votes to stay on the ballot; if he does, he can remain on the ballot for up to ten years. Burnett with the Yankees was 35-34 from 2009 to 2011. Surprisingly the only time he was an All-Star was in his last year of play in 2015 with the Pirates.

ROGER CLEMENS, RHP

Clemens association with PED’s will likely ever allow him to get into the Baseball Hall of Fame, although he came the closest this year with 61.6% of the vote, which’s 54 votes shy of being elected. Please don’t feel bad; Barry Bonds will probably not receive the honor either he came 53 votes short. For Clemens, it was his 8th try. While with the Yankees from 1999 to 2003, he was 83-42 with an ERA of 4.01.

ANDRUW JONES, CF

Jones closed out his 17-year baseball career with the New York Yankees and retired after the 2012 season. In his two years with the Yankee, he batted just .220 with 27 home runs. His best years were with the Atlanta Braves. He, in his fourth try he got 33.9% of the ballot.

ANDY PETTITTE, LHP

Yankee fan-favorite Andy Pettitte was on the ballot for the third time and received  only13.7% of the vote, but it was his highest percentage to date. Andy, like several other players, was involved in PED’s. Many feel unlike most of the drug users; his infarction was minor to treat an ailment. He was remorseful and apologized to the Yankee organization and its fans. A group of sportswriters are hard-nosed and feel, and any PED involvement is an immediate disqualification for the Hall. Pettitte is the winningest pitcher in the postseason during modern times.

GARY SHEFFIELD, OF

Sheffield’s 40.6% is the highest number of votes he has gotten in his four years of candidacy. Sheffield played in Yankee Stadium’s outfield from 2004 to 2006 for most of it; he was dogged with a bad shoulder. In his three years with the Yankees, he provided excellent defense in the outfield and batted .291 with 96 home runs. He had a remarkable 22-year career, mostly with the Florida Marlins, although he played for nine different teams in his career.

NICK SWISHER, 1B/OF

Swisher was a big fan favorite of Yankees fans, not so of the sportswriters; in his first year of candidacy, he received no votes and will not be on the ballot again. While with the Yankees from 2009 to 2012, he batted .268 with 105 home runs. He played both in the outfield and at first base for the Yankees. Can you say smile? His best years were with the Yankees, and he dramatically fell off after leaving the team. He finished his career in 2015 with the Atlanta Braves.

It’s not like the Baseball Hall of Fame will have nothing to celebrate this year. Last year the celebration was canceled by the coronavirus. So this year, from July 23-26 in Cooperstown, N.Y., the celebration will go on. New York Yankee great Derek Jeter will be enshrined along with Larry Walker, Marvin Miller, and Ted Simmons. Jeter fell just one vote short of a unanimous vote by the sportswriters. Yankee great closer Mariano Rivera is the only player to receive a unanimous vote. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2019.

Other notables that did not get in this year include Barry Bond (PED’s), Curt Shilling (politics/homophobic), Mark Buehrle, Latroy Hawkins, Todd Helton Manny Ramirez, among a few others.

New York Yankees Top 10s: Check out the best Yankee acquisitions ever

In my New York Yankees top 10 series that has covered most aspects of Yankee baseball, today we take a look at the top 10 Yankee acquisitions in the modern era.  These acquisitions come from both signings and trades.  The Yankees have had many star players that were homegrown but also at times had to look outside their farm system to fill various needs.  Owner George M. Steinbrenner was the first owner to make big moves and set the tone for acquisitions for the future.  This has been the most difficult to complete top 10s so far.  I am sure many will disagree with the placements.

10. Ricky Henderson

Henderson was one of the longest-tenured players, playing for 25 years, 5 of them with the Yankees.  During his five years, he stole 326 bases, making him the all-time base stealer for the Yankees. During the span, he hit .288 and had 78 home runs while having an excellent fielding percentage in all areas of the outfield.  He was an All-Star every year he was a New York Yankee.

9. CC Sabathia

CC Sabathia was instrumental in the Yankees winning their last World Series in 2009.  Sabathia came to the Yankees from the Milwaukee Brewers. In his eleven years with the Yankees, he had a record of 134 and 88.  During the Yankees years, he was a workhorse always giving his best effort for a win.

8. Masahiro Tanaka

Brian Cashman brought Masahiro Tanaka to the Yankees from the Eagles of the Japanese league in 2013 in a seven-year contract that will end this season, whether there is one or not. During his time with the Yankees up to this year he is 75-45 with a 3.75 ERA. Tanaka has never had a losing season with the Yankees.

7. David Wells

The highlight of David Wells’s career was his perfect game on May 17, 1998, the tenth no-hitter in Yankee history.  Wells for the Yankees was 34-14 in his two-year stint, that’s a .706 winning percentage one of the best for the Yankees. Wells pitched 21 years all in the American League.

Wells was quite a character that didn’t care much for rules.  He has admitted he pitched his perfect game while nursing a bad hangover. In 1998 he would help the Yankees with his 18-4 record and propelled them to the World Series shut out of the San Diego Padres.

6. Reggie Jackson

Yankee owner George M. Steinbrenner made Reggie Jackson the highest-paid baseball player at the time when he hired Jackson from the Baltimore Orioles. Jackson was a controversial player as he was a bit of a show-off and Manager Billy Martin didn’t want the Yankees to hire him.  It didn’t help when he was quoted as saying “I’m the straw that stirs the drink” a phase that he never said, but caused a rift with Yankee catcher Thurmon Munson.

Jackson in his five years with the Yankees had many memorable moments including his three home runs that caused him to be called “Mr. October.” In 1977 in the sixth game of the World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, New York Yankees outfielder Reggie Jackson hit three home runs off three consecutive pitches from three different pitchers. Jackson batted .284 with 144 home runs while a Yankee.

5. Mike Mussina

On this list, Mike Mussina is the one player that often flew under the radar. Mussina after being a Baltimore Oriole star pitcher became a New York Yankee.  In his eight years with the Yankees he never had a losing season winning 10 or more games every year.  Mussina was not only an outstanding pitcher but he was an excellent defender as any pitcher to ever grace the mound.

On some writer’s top 10 lists they don’t even include Mussina.  For the Yankees he was Mr. Steady being one of the Yankee’s most dependable pitchers during his time with the Yankees.  The highly intelligent Stanford grad, with a thinking pitcher that adjusted to every situation.  His performance never diminished with age. In the last year of his career he had his first 20 win season, becoming the oldest pitcher to have a 20 win season.

For his pitching with both the Baltimore Orioles and the New York Yankees on January 22, 2019, he was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, receiving 76.71% of the vote.  Mike has the distinction of being the first American League pitcher to win ten or more games in each of 17 consecutive seasons

4. Alex Rodriguez

Alex Rodriguez is a controversial New York Yankee to say the least.  Many fans cite his use of performance-enhancing drugs while with the Texas Rangers and tend to ignore his performance with the Yankee club. But the facts are still the facts.  During his 22 years playing the game he was one of the best in either league.

For his 12 years with the Yankees, he hit 30 home runs a year, with 1,100 RBIs while hitting .283. He was a seven-time All-Star and a seven-time MVP candidate, winning the prestigious award twice.  He would be a first-ballot inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame if it was not for his drug use which most likely will never come to fruition.

I have to admit that I am a writer that does not place as much importance on drug use as many writers do.  My stance is that dozens if not hundreds of other players used some type of doping during that period that were never caught, thus many stats for that period may be in question.  In the case of Rodriguez, his career wouldn’t have been less impressive even if he hadn’t made the bad decision to break the rules.

3. Paul O’Neill

Paul O’Neil played for only two teams in his baseball career, nine years with the Yankees in the second half of his career.  At the end of the 1992 season the Red traded O’Neill outright for Yankee outfielder Roberto Kelly. In his first year, he batted .311 with 20 home runs and 75 RBIs.  O’Neill played with such vigor that owner George M. Steinbrenner would give him the nickname the “Warrior” which stuck.

In his second year he got the AL batting title batting .359.  If O’Neill missed a hit he thought he should have gotten, batting racks and water coolers often felt his wrath.  Stick Michael made the trade that would change the face of the Yankees for years to come.  Paul made amazing plays in defending the right field. He played fiercely and hurt, he was the ultimate warrior the Yankee fans loved.

2. Roger Clemens

The acquisition of Roger Clemens was one of the best the New York Yankees ever made. In 1996 the Yankees sent Graeme Lloyd, David Wells, and Homer Bush to the Toronto Blue Jays for their ace pitcher Clemens. In his first year with the Yankees he helped them win the 1999 World Series. In 2000 he almost single-handedly took them again to the World Series with his 20-3 season.  The Yankees would win that series as well. Clemens was never fully embraced by Yankee fans due to his long tenure with the Boston Red Sox.

Also in 2000 Roger would win the prestigious Cy Young Award at the age of 38.  Roger is one of the longer tenures pitchers in baseball, pitching for 24 years.  With the Yankees he would win twice as many games as he lost.  He went 83-42 in his six years with the Yankees for a .664 winning percentage.  It is outrageous that this 3 time Cy Young Award isn’t in the Hall of Fame.  This year he received 72.5% of the votes compared to the 75% needed to be inducted.  He has two years left of eligibility.

1. Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth isn’t a modern era Yankee acquisition but must be included in the list as the best move the Yankees ever made in procuring him from the cash strapped Boston Red Sox.  Following Ruth becoming a Yankee, he transformed himself into a great hitting outfielder. He really made his name with the Yankees as one of the best if not the best player to ever play the game of baseball.

Honorable mentions:

David Cone, Starky Lyle, Roger Maris, Tino Martinez, Scott Brosius, Curtis Granderson, and Nick Swisher.

Gerrit Cole could not be included for the Yankee top 10s as he hasn’t thrown a ball for the Yankees in the major leagues.  He however has to be mentioned as he may be in the future proclaimed one of the best Yankee acquisitions in history, only time will tell.

EmpireSportsMedia.com’s Columnist William Parlee is a member of the Society for American Baseball Research.  Follow me on Twitter @parleewilliam.

New York Yankees: Roger Clemens deserves to be a Hall of Famer

New York Yankees

With the upcoming Hall of Fame class being inducted into Cooperstown this July, pending any coronavirus setbacks, It gives us a chance to reflect on the storied careers of the best athletes in baseball. Each inductee is judged on their performances with many of the voters split one way or another on their decisions. Some of the former players in question are more controversial than others.  I’d like to take the time to give my opinion on one former New York Yankees player who I believe has earned a right to be considered one of the best of the best. Look no further than the man they call Rocket. I’m talking about Roger Clemens.

Growing up as a kid in the 90’s and 2000’s, I idolized Roger Clemens.  I thought he was the greatest pitcher in baseball. His statistics definitely backed me up on that as well.  Who else could say they won 7 Cy Young awards, 11 All-star game selections, 2 World Series Championships, 2 pitching Triple Crowns, and an American League MVP award?  He demanded the attention every time he stepped on the mound. He had a bulldog mentality on the mound where he was going to attack every hitter right from his first pitch.  He pitched with a fire in him that made him a fierce competitor. Win or Lose, he put it all out on the table. Watching him pitch is what made me want to be a pitcher myself.  I wanted to emulate his pitching style in every way possible from the brim of his hat coming in just above his eyes with my glove held up high enough to just peer over, to the chest-high leg kick that allowed him to reach back and blow a fastball by someone.  I loved how fearless he was. If a batter was crowding the plate, he would throw a blazing fastball high and tight to back them off. Hitters knew he had no problem giving them a little “chin music”, a phrase long forgotten now. In the back of their minds, they knew he wouldn’t back down, giving way to the idea that many of them were “out” before they came to the plate.  It was a mental game as well as a physical one.

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As we all know, when the Mitchell Report came out with their list of performance-enhancing drug users, Clemens’ name was high on that list.  Allegedly, he started taking PEDs during the 1998 season. After a lengthy trial, he was acquitted of all charges. I know this doesn’t prove one way or another of his prior transgressions, the justice system has ruled that there was not sufficient enough evidence to decide on the matter.  But if you look at his career prior to 1998, he still has a Hall of Fame-caliber resume.

While pitching for the dreaded Boston Red Sox, he managed to win the previously mentioned MVP award, 3 of his Cy Young awards, and five of his all-star selections.  To top it all off, he also became the first pitcher ever to record a 20 strikeout game. He is currently still the Red Sox all-time leader in strikeouts with 2,590. A brilliant 12-year career with the Red Sox before making his way to the New York Yankees in 1999 and then again in 2007.

I have a theory on the steroid accusations.  Most players who take steroids use them to elevate their game to another level ala Barry Bonds and his enormous head. They want to become one of the best in their respective fields and have all the fame and money and stardom that comes along with it. Roger Clemens was already a star and one of the best pitchers in the game prior to his alleged use of PED’s.  What if Clemens took PED’s to give him more longevity in the prime of his career? Most pitchers, and all players for that matter, enjoy their career highs around ages 27-32 roughly before starting to decline usually gradually. Maybe Clemens wanted to enjoy that prime for a longer period of time? Maybe the competitor in him knew that Father time would be calling his name and he wouldn’t be able to compete to the best of his abilities anymore. In this case, I find my theory more plausible given that he was already one of the best in the game.  If this really was the case, I find myself more understanding of those actions.

Now I’m not trying to say that taking steroids, or HGH or any performance-enhancing drugs is okay.  What I believe, is that Roger Clemens, whether someone likes him or not, deserves his spot in the Hall of Fame. If you look at his career in separate chapters “pre-PED’s” and “post-PED’s” it paints a picture of a pitcher at the top of his game that achieved various awards that some players can only dream of. Neither the court’s rulings or my own opinion is enough to change how others may feel about Clemens as a player but hopefully, some light has been shed on his incredible career.