New York Giants: Evan Engram speaks on Freddie Kitchens’ influence

New York Giants, Freddie Kitchens, Cleveland Browns

When the New York Giants announced joint practices with the Cleveland Browns, many noted the connection between head coaches Joe Judge and Kevin Stefanski. However, not as many noted the connection between the Browns and another member of the Giants coaching staff.

Freddie Kitchens was the head coach in Cleveland before coming to the Giants as a tight ends coach, a role which has been increased to senior offensive assistant for this season.

His return to Cleveland brought some praise from his former players despite things not working out when he was the head coach.

“Freddie, that’s my guy. He was my first NFL running backs coach of my career,” Cleveland running back Nick Chubb told reporters on Thursday.

But it’s not just some of Kitchens’ former players with the Browns who appreciate the coach. Kitchens will likely play a larger role in planning the Giants offense this season as a higher ranking staff member than last year, and Giants tight end Evan Engram already took note of his expanded role and impact.

In his position now, he’s able to work with the line and then kind of work with us and kind of oversee the offense. His input on a lot of stuff helps us and he’s been around ball a long time. He’s been in every position room, so he knows a lot. Last year it was good working with him. For him to have a little bit more freedom this year around the offense is a big help for us,” Engram said Thursday.

Evaluating Kitchens’ impact on the coaching staff

The decision to promote Kitchens to senior offensive assistant is widely seen as a response to Jason Garrett’s offensive struggles in his first season. The Giants didn’t have a very good offense under Garrett, but with a full offseason to make changes, one of the minimum expectations is that the Giants try different things in offensive schemes and playcalling this year.

Kitchens has coached running backs, tight ends, and quarterbacks during his career at both the college and pro level. Before his stint as a head coach, he served as both an assistant head coach and an offensive coordinator in Cleveland. In other words, he brings plenty of experience coaching offense and may be an influence in spicing up a dry offense that led to many struggles for the Giants this year.

The statement from Engram seems to confirm that Kitchens has taken well to a role looking after the entire offense rather than just the tight ends, and with the Giants adding a number of new weapons this offseason and getting back Saquon Barkley, we should expect to see a lot of new offensive looks come September.

New York Giants: Freddie Kitchens’s promotion could lead to a more vertical offense

New York Giants, Freddie Kitchens, Cleveland Browns

The 2020 New York Giants offense was pitiful. They averaged a putrid 17.5 points per game, ranked 31st in the NFL. But things might change drastically for the stale dink-and-dunk Giants passing attack in 2021. Joe Judge and the Giants made crucial changes to their coaching staff this offseason to fix their offense, including a key promotion of Freddie Kitchens.

Last offseason, the New York Giants hired Joe Judge as their next head coach. Coach Judge built an impressive staff that included numerous former-head coaches as assistants. In 2019, Freddie Kitchens was the head coach of the Cleveland Browns before being fired and ultimately hired the same offseason by the Giants as a tight ends coach.

Freddie Kitchens’s role has changed this offseason. Kitchens received a promotion from tight ends coach to “senior offensive assistant.” This promotion will give Freddie Kitchens more responsibility with the offensive line’s connection to the scheme and could also give him a greater influence on the offense’s passing attack.

How Freddie Kitchens can influence the Giants’ offense

Working with the offensive line

Head coach Joe Judge said that Freddie Kitchens’s “primary responsibility is going to be working with the front” in his new senior offensive assistant position. Judge explained, “tying into having two young offensive line coaches with Rob and Ben, I think Freddie is going to be an asset up front working directly with them and helping bring together the game planning, like all of our coaches will, but working directly with (offensive coordinator) Jason (Garrett) with some of the things that are going to happen upfront.”

This move could lead to less miscommunication along the offensive line. Kitchens will work to streamline the communication between the offensive line and the offensive coordinator. Freddie Kitchens will work to help the Giants’ young offensive line develop this year, but his influence in the team’s offensive scheme might be even more exciting.

Creating a more vertical passing attack

It is no question that the Giants want to get more vertical on offense in 2021. They added one of the best vertical weapons in the entire NFL this offseason with they signed star wide receiver Kenny Golladay. The Giants also added speedy wide receiver Kadarius Toney in the draft. These two could create an elite vertical receiving duo.

The Giants’ new wide receivers will go as far as the scheme lets them. The biggest criticism of Jason Garrett’s offensive scheme in 2020 was the lack of vertical passing concepts. That is bound to change in 2021 with the new weapons acquired and the promotion of Freddie Kitchens.

Freddie Kitchens’s influence

Quarterbacks in Freddie Kitchens’s offense tend to have a high average depth of target. Under Todd Haley in 2018, Baker Mayfield’s ADOT was just 6.8 but shot up to 9.1 once Freddie Kitchens took over. According to PFF, Mayfield’s ADOT under Kitchens in 2018 was 9.6 yards, a very deep average. Kitchens again had him over 9 yards in 2019, averaging 9.2 yards ADOT.

Compare this to Daniel Jones’s first two seasons in the NFL. Under Shurmur in 2018, Jones’s ADOT was 8.4 yards. Garrett’s notoriously non-vertical offense in 2018 brought Daniel Jones’s ADOT down to 8.0 yards. Now, as a senior offensive assistant, one must assume that Freddie Kitchens will help Jason Garrett implement more vertical passing concepts and try to raise Daniel Jones’s ADOT in 2021.

Baker Mayfield threw 72 total 20+ yard passes in 2018 and 76 attempts in 2019. Kitchens had him airing the ball deep frequently. Daniel Jones threw 54 deep passes under Shurmur in 2018, playing in only 12 games. In 14 games under Garrett in 2020, Jones threw far fewer deep balls, only 43 total. This is obviously a problem, especially when considering Daniel Jones had a 132.5 passer rating on 20+ yard throws last season, the highest in the NFL.

What this means for Daniel Jones and the Giants’ offense

It’s time to see more Danny Dimes. Daniel Jones was, statistically, one of the best deep passers in the NFL last season. NFL’s Next Gen Stats listed Jones as the top-ranked deep passer in 2020. Next Gen Stats notes that Daniel’s CPOE (completion percentage over expected) on deep passes was +14.8%, the highest percentage in the league.

According to Pro Football Focus, Daniel Jones was the third-highest graded quarterback in the NFL on deep passes in 2020. Jones’s 95.6 deep-passing grade ranked behind only Russell Wilson and Derek Carr last season.

As the Giants’ offense moves toward a more vertical passing attack in 2021, this could be huge for Daniel Jones in his make-or-break third season. Daniel Jones is an efficient deep-passing quarterback. He has not thrown the deep ball very often in his first two NFL seasons. But when he has, he has proven to have elite downfield accuracy. Freddie Kitchens will work to increase the volume of deep passes that Daniel Jones throws this season, leading to a more explosive New York Giants offense.

What Freddie Kitchens’s promotion means for the New York Giants’ offense in 2021

New York Giants, Freddie Kitchens, Cleveland Browns

New York Giants head coach Joe Judge made some key changes to his coaching staff this offseason. When Judge was hired in the 2020 offseason, he built a strong coaching staff that featured many former head coaches in assistant coaching roles. One of those former head coaches was Freddie Kitchens, Judge hired him as the tight ends coach.

Freddie Kitchens served as head coach of the Cleveland Browns in the 2019 season. Kitchens took over as the offensive coordinator for Cleveland in the 2018 season after the team fired Todd Haley. Rookie quarterback Baker Mayfield saw his game elevate to another level once Kitchens was put in charge. Unfortunately, things did not end well for Kitchens in Cleveland, as the Browns disappointed in 2019 and fired their head coach after one season.

Joe Judge then brought Freddie Kitchens onto his staff as a tight ends coach. But, after just one season, Kitchens’s role with the Giants is changing. Coach Judge gave Kitchens a promotion this offseason to “senior offensive assistant.” This new role will change Freddie Kitchens’s responsibilities with the team completely while also having a significant impact on the Giants’ offense.

How Freddie Kitchens will make the offense more vertical

At the beginning of Freddie Kitchens’s career, he worked under Bruce Arians with the Arizona Cardinals. Kitchens learned a lot from Arians and developed his playbook based on the former Cardinals head coach’s offensive scheme. Like Arians, Kitchens loves to utilize 11 personnel and his offense places a heavy emphasis on vertical passing concepts.

Quarterbacks in Kitchens’s offense tend to have a high average depth of target. Under Todd Haley, Baker Mayfield’s ADOT was just 6.8 but shot up to 9.1 once Freddie Kitchens took over. According to PFF, Mayfield’s ADOT under Kitchens in 2018 was 9.6 yards, a very deep average. Kitchens again had him over 9 yards in 2019, averaging 9.2 yards ADOT.

Compare this to Daniel Jones’s first two seasons in the NFL. Under Shurmur in 2018, Jones’s ADOT was 8.4 yards. Garrett’s notoriously non-vertical offense in 2018 brought Daniel Jones’s ADOT down to 8.0 yards. Now, as a senior offensive assistant, one must assume that Freddie Kitchens will help Jason Garrett implement more vertical passing concepts and try to raise Daniel Jones’s ADOT in 2021.

Baker Mayfield threw 72 total 20+ yard passes in 2018 and 76 attempts in 2019. Kitchens had him airing the ball deep frequently. Daniel Jones threw 54 deep passes under Shurmur in 2018, playing in only 12 games. In 14 games under Garrett in 2020, Jones threw far fewer deep balls, only 43 total. This is obviously a problem, especially when considering Daniel Jones had a 132.5 passer rating on 20+ yard throws last season, the highest in the NFL.

Daniel Jones is an efficient deep-ball passer. Unfortunately, he rarely pushes the ball downfield due to a lack of vertical passing concepts in Jason Garrett’s offensive scheme. Freddie Kitchens should alleviate this issue and help Garrett get the ball downfield more frequently.

How Freddie Kitchens will help the offensive line develop

Head coach Joe Judge said that Kitchens’s “primary responsibility is going to be working with the front” in his new senior offensive assistant position. Judge explained, “tying into having two young offensive line coaches with Rob and Ben, I think Freddie is going to be an asset up front working directly with them and helping bring together the game planning, like all of our coaches will, but working directly with (offensive coordinator) Jason (Garrett) with some of the things that are going to happen upfront.”

New York Giants: Revamped coaching staff might be able to fix the offensive line

New York Giants, Matt Peart

The New York Giants offensive line poses a huge question mark for the team entering the 2021 season. In 2020, the Giants’ offensive line was one of the worst in the NFL. The New York Giants’ pass-block win rate in 2020, according to ESPN, ranked dead-last in the NFL at 46%. Their run-block win rate ranked 18th at 70%, which is about average or slightly below. So while the Giants did upgrade Daniel Jones’s weapons in free agency, fans feel like they still desperately need to fix the offensive line in front of him.

The Giants barely touched their offensive line in this year’s offseason period. They added veteran guard Zack Fulton to the mix but failed to add any offensive line talent in the NFL Draft. The Giants are going to rely on their young offensive linemen to take a jump and see some great development this season.

One of the reasons the Giants feel confident in their young linemen is their coaching staff. The Giants feel like their new revamped offensive coaching staff will be able to get the most out of their front line and fix some of their deficiencies.

How the new coaching staff will help the offensive line

The addition of Rob Sale

The Giants started the 2020 season with Marc Colombo as their offensive line coach. Ben Wilkerson served as the assistant offensive line coach. Colombo was fired midseason, though, for insubordination as Joe Judge was unpleased with the offensive line’s performance and looked to make changes. Dave DeGuglielmo was then brought in as Colombo’s replacement before parting ways this offseason.

Joe Judge hired Rob Sale as the Giants’ offensive line coach this offseason. Ben Wilkerson will continue as the assistant offensive line coach. The hiring of Rob Sale is exciting as he is a coach that Joe Judge describes as an “energetic on-the-field coach and he’s someone who has a very strong relationship with his players.” Sale was hired from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette where he worked as the team’s offensive line coach and offensive coordinator. His background calling plays and developing schemes could foreshadow a greater role with the Giants in the future.

Coming from the collegiate game, Robert Sale has experience working with young offensive linemen. The Giants will be rolling out a front line that features three second-year players and two third-year players as starters in 2021. Youth means inexperience, but it also means potential, and Rob Sale will try to maximize the potential of these hog mollies.

But Sale and Wilkerson will not coach these linemen alone. Joe Judge rearranged the coaching staff to hyperfocus on the development of his offensive linemen. In addition to hiring Sale, Judge made some other important moves.

Pat Flaherty as an offensive consultant

Former Giants offensive line coach Pat Flaherty has joined the staff as a consultant. Flaherty served as the Giants’ offensive line coach from 2004-2015, winning two Super Bowls with the team and developing the likes of Chris Snee, David Diehl, Shaun O’Hara, Rich Seubert, Kareem McKenzie, Kevin Boothe, and David Baas.

Judge brought in Flaherty as a consultant for both the offensive and defensive sides of the ball. One thing that Joe Judge noted, though, was the assistance Flaherty will bring Rob Sale as he develops the offensive line, saying, “Part of the strength is we’ve got two young offensive line coaches with Rob Sale and (assistant) Ben Wilkerson, and Pat’s a good sounding board for those guys to have.”

Freddie Kitchens as a senior offensive assistant

Pat Flaherty will help coach up the offensive line and so will Freddie Kitchens. Joe Judge moved Freddie Kitchens into a new role this offseason, promoting him from tight ends coach to senior offensive assistant. This will give Kitchens more say in the Giants’ offensive playbook and scheme development, but Judge explained that Kitchens will also work closely with the offensive line.

Head coach Joe Judge said that Kitchens’s “primary responsibility is going to be working with the front.” He explained, “tying into having two young offensive line coaches with Rob and Ben, I think Freddie is going to be an asset up front working directly with them and helping bring together the game planning, like all of our coaches will, but working directly with (offensive coordinator) Jason (Garrett) with some of the things that are going to happen up front.”

The collaborative effort

The Giants now have four coaches on staff whose primary objectives are to develop the offensive line along with offensive coordinator Jason Garrett. With all hands on deck heading into 2021, New York might be able to see some serious development from their young group of hog mollies. The Giants’ offensive line should benefit greatly from this strong, revamped coaching staff.

New York Giants: Joe Judge quietly promotes Freddie Kitchens to senior assistant

New York Giants, Freddie Kitchens, Cleveland Browns

When Freddie Kitchens joined the New York Giants as a tight ends coach, some expected more. Specifically, that the tight ends coaching job might be a stepping stone to a larger role in the organization. With the disappointing year one performance from offensive coordinator Jason Garrett, those talks only intensified. It seems like Kitchens might be a preferred offensive coordinator in the eyes of Joe Judge, after all.

Kitchens hasn’t taken over as a coordinator, but he did move up in the coaching staff to become a senior offensive assistant rather than just the coach of the tight ends.

It appears that fellow assistant Derek Dooley, most notable for being the former head coach of the University of Tennessee, will act as the tight end coach now that Kitchens is moving positions.

As the former head coach of the Browns, tight ends coach looked like a rather low position for Kitchens to settle for. It’s not surprising to see him move up in the ranks and take on a larger role. This also appears to be a move from Joe Judge to shape the offense further and make changes from last season, when the Giants had one of the worst offenses in the league.

While Jason Garrett isn’t getting replaced this season, the presence of Kitchens on the offensive staff might prompt some different offensive decisions that shake things up compared to the stale offense from last year.

All in all, it’s a promotion that’s not entirely unexpected and seems like a win for the Giants on the offensive side of the ball.

New York Giants: OC Jason Garrett expected to return to the Giants

New York Giants, Jason Garrett

New York Giants offensive coordinator Jason Garrett was interviewing for the Los Angeles Chargers head coach vacancy several weeks ago. The Chargers went with Rams defensive coordinator Brandon Staley over Garrett. The Chargers were the only team that asked to interview Garrett this offseason. Garrett is expected to come back and be the New York Giants offensive coordinator for the second straight year.

Giants’ OC Jason Garrett is expected to return after a shaky season in which the team finished 31st in total offense and points scored, per Jordan Raanan, ESPN Giants beat writer.

Raanan also stated, “although Garrett will stay, there will be some changes to the Giants’ offensive staff, among them the possibility of internal alterations when it comes to the responsibilities of those currently on staff. Increased responsibility for quarterbacks coach Jerry Schuplinski, wide receivers coach Tyke Tolbert and tight ends coach Freddie Kitchens is possible.”

If you remember when Garrett got Covid-19 during the season, Kitchens was called upon to call plays for New York against his former team, the Cleveland Browns. Tolbert, meanwhile, is a solid option for some power-sharing, but he’s beginning to draw interest for other roles throughout the league. Currently, the Minnesota Vikings have their eye on him to become their offensive coordinator.

However things ultimately shake out, it would appear as if Garrett will make his way back to East Rutherford next season and resume his role as the team’s offensive coordinator for the 2021 season.

New York Giants: What should we expect from Freddie Kitchens as the offensive play-caller in week 15?

New York Giants, Freddie Kitchens, Cleveland Browns

The New York Giants learned that offensive coordinator Jason Garrett tested positive for Covid on Thursday, which will force him out for the game against Cleveland on Sunday evening. In his absence, the Giants have tapped tight end coach Freddie Kitchens to call plays, and this could either be a revelation or a stagnation.

New York Giants official statement:

Giants Statement: Offensive Coordinator Jason Garrett has tested positive for COVID-19. He will continue to work remotely. Tight ends coach Freddie Kitchens will serve as the team’s offensive play caller on Sunday against the Cleveland Browns.

We are currently working with the league’s chief medical officer regarding close contacts. Because of the league’s most updated protocols, Giants coaches and players did not meet on either Monday or Tuesday, and the majority of the coaching staff worked remotely.

At this point, there appear to be no high risk close contacts. We are awaiting confirmation from the league. Out of an abundance of caution, the Giants will meet remotely and will not practice today.
In 2018 when Kitchens took over as the OC in week 8, Baker Mayfield saw his numbers skyrocket for the rest of the year: 70.7 completion % (fifth), 13 touchdowns (seventh), 5 INTs Averaged 8.66 yards per attempt (second only to Patrick Mahomes II), and a 109.3 passer rating (fifth).
The offense Kitchens will deploy will be similar to Garrett’s in terms of route combinations and run blocking, but the way he calls them will be different. Considering the offensive line just allowed eight sacks to the Arizona Cardinals this past weekend, kitchens will look to get the ball out of Colt McCoy or Daniel Jones’ hands quickly, avoiding instantaneous pressure and making easy first reads available.
Kitchens knows what the Cleveland Browns have on defense, especially in their pass rush. The threat they possess will force the Giants to get rid of the ball quickly and opt for running the ball more frequently.
One thing Kitchens did when he took over for the Browns in 2018 was ask his players what plays they liked the most. This allowed him to tailor specific plays to his player’s strengths, which theoretically is an obvious yet genius idea. What we’ve seen from Giants quarterbacks the first 14 weeks of the season is hesitancy in the pocket, not moving on from progressions, and failing to make decisive reads. Kitchens managed to decrease the hits Baker Mayfield took and sacks allowed significantly once he took over two years ago.
However, in 2019, Mayfield did not perform as well as most hoped under Kitchens. His offensive scheme fell apart when Odell Beckham Jr. joined the ranks. It seems as if the Browns experienced a similar reality to the Giants with Pat Shurmur.
Shurmur was a fantastic offensive coordinator but simply couldn’t handle the duties of being a head coach and calling offensive plays. Since Freddie will only be calling the plays on Sunday for the Giants, maybe we will see what he’s really capable of with less pressure on his back.

New York Giants offensive coordinator Jason Garrett tests positive for COVID-19

New York Giants, Austin Mack, Jason Garrett

The New York Giants haven’t had too much serious trouble with COVID-19 this season, but that’s changing as offensive coordinator Jason Garrett has tested positive. This news comes a bit too close to the game with the Cleveland Browns for comfort, and Garrett won’t be out of isolation by the time the game happens.

The team isn’t going to leave anyone wondering about what the outcome of this will be, however. The Giants have already announced that tight ends coach Freddie Kitchens will take the spot of Garrett as the play caller for the Cleveland game.

Garrett will continue to work remotely but the temporary promotion of Kitchens will raise some eyebrows for multiple reasons. For one, the game against Cleveland is a revenge game for Kitchens as he was previously the head coach of the team. He was named the head coach in January 2019 but ended up fired only hours after the season finale that year. Kitchens also has offensive coordinator experience, as he served in the role for Cleveland before taking over as their coach.

Kitchens, who joined the Giants staff this year, is believed by some to be in the running for the Giants offensive coordinator spot if Jason Garrett leaves for a head coaching job or is fired this offseason. That situation makes it all the more interesting to see him call plays for the Giants offense on Sunday, in a possible preview of what the team could be getting.

“We are currently working with the league’s chief medical officer regarding close contacts…” the team said in a statement about Garrett. “Out of an abundance of caution, the Giants will meet remotely and will not practice today.”

Giants’ Freddie Kitchens raves about Joe Judge as new head coach

New York Giants, Freddie Kitchens, Cleveland Browns

The New York Giants have undoubtedly overhauled their mentality and coaching staff since the hiring of head coach Joe Judge. Bringing in former head coaches Freddie Kitchens, and Jason Garrett was a positive move to help judge adapt to the NFL style.

Having served as the special-teams coordinator the past few seasons, Judge made the leap directly to head coach, which had been a rarity prior to this development. Co-owner John Mara didn’t need much convincing to hire the former Patriot coordinator, based on his immense attention to detail and the fundamentalist approach.

Having a young team with valuable draft capital helped Judge dive into the action and move forward with his style. Having people and players to support his mentality was a priority, and utilizing the fresh minds of his youth players is a priority.

Freddie Kitchens, who is most recently the head coach of the Cleveland Browns, had great things to say about Joe.

He primarily harped on Joe’s attention to positive habits. Holding people accountable and being extremely organized should promote a more successful team on game day. With the NFL regular season set to start in less than a month, things have to come together rather quickly.

The New York Giants are making progress:

Judge had plenty of positive things to say about his team’s Friday intrasquad scrimmage. The intensity and knowledge of the playbook have been apparent with a young nucleus of players, but a lot more work needs to be done before they are game ready. This off-season has been incredibly challenging for a first your head coach, but Judge has taken everything in stride and has instilled confidence in the fan-base up to this point.

With a rookie left tackle in Andrew Thomas and Xavier McKinney manning the free safety spot, I fully expect 2020 to be a developmental season. Judge understands that the rebuild is still underway, and he is approaching every day with that fact in mind.

New York Giants’ TE coach Freddie Kitchens raves about Evan Engram

New York Giants, Giants, Evan Engram

The New York Giants are going into the 2020 season with a bevy of different tight ends to utilize. After Rhett Ellison suffered a concussion in 2019 that lead him toward retirement, Big Blue went out and signed former San Francisco tight end, Levine Toilolo. Currently, they have Evan Engram, Kaden Smith, and Toilolo as their primary options at the position. With pads going on players Monday, the Giants can finally begin to evaluate what they have and how they can utilize the talent available.

A brief summary of each:

Evan Engram is a primary pass-catching tight end that is great on mesh and seam routes but is not the most refined blocker. Given the lack of size, his ability to run routes and get open for Daniel Jones is how the Giants will likely utilize him moving forward.

Kaden Smith is another solid player coming off his rookie season in 2019. Showing off an ability to get open in the passing game and potential in run-blocking, he could be a multi-faceted player that is grouped in with Egram frequently in 12 personnel sets.

Toilolo is a primary run blocker, who can replace the duties of Ellison. While he has enjoyed some success as a receiver, he will be a primary lead blocker for Saquon Barkley.

However, Engram remains the number one tight end for the Giants, and new coach Freddie kitchens is excited to see what he can do.

Here’s what the New York Giants’ tight end coach had to say:

“He’s a team-oriented guy,” Kitchens said. “He’s been working his tail off to get better each and every day, and he’s done a good job of just staying in the moment, like we all should be doing. Just try to get a little better each day and see where you’re at in a couple of weeks.”

Engram is going into his fourth season in the NFL, and injuries have taken their toll on his development. He has seen his yardage totals decrease every season, but if he can stay healthy 2020, he could take the steps necessary to become a premier threat in the league. Kitchens believes he has progressed and taken steps forward this off-season.

“I think Evan is in the mindset that he should be in, and that’s just getting better today,” he said. “We’re trying to stay in the moment here with every position, with every player, with every coach, and keep our head down and just work to get better each and every day. Evan has done a good job up to this point in doing that. He did a hell of a job this summer in rehabbing and getting back to where he’s at right now, and just kind of taking it day to day and getting better with his releases, his hand placement, with everything.

“Every aspect of Evan’s game, we want to try to get better at each and every day. Evan’s done an unbelievable job in staying focused and concentrating on, even more specific to every day, just every rep. He’s done a good job and we’re just going to stay in the moment.”

If the Giants can finally extract the best out of Evan, their passing attack will be completely different. In recent years, they’ve been forced to utilize more 11 personnel without a quality tight end in the receiving game. After missing eight games last year due to a midfoot sprain, Kaden Smith received a majority of the reps. The potential he showed ultimately became a good thing for the Giants, and will likely factor into the offensive scheme in some way.