Alex Rodriguez rips Yankees over jersey retirement

New York Yankees, Alex Rodriguez
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 15: Alex Rodriguez #13 of the New York Yankees in action against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Yankee Stadium on August 15, 2013 in the Bronx borough of New York City. The Angels defeated the Yankees 8-4. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees seem to attract bad headlines lately, whether it be their performance on the baseball diamond or former players ripping them for whatever reason.

On Friday, former Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez showed some displeasure in the fact that the organization hasn’t retired his number yet, even allowing former trade bust Joey Gallo to wear the No. 13. He was eventually moved to the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Rodriguez was a pillar in the Yankees’ success years ago, playing 2,784 MLB games with Seattle, Texas, and New York. He spent most of his career with the Yankees, putting up some of the best baseball numbers ever seen.

“Of course, it bothers me,” Rodriguez said on “Evan & Tiki” with Evan Roberts and Tiki Barber on Wednesday. “It’s less about bother, but of course it would be nice to be recognized in one of the coolest places to be in Yankee history, but that’s not my decision.”

Alex Rodriguez Was a Monster For the Yankees

Rodriguez hit 696 career homers with 2,086 RBIs, a career .295 batting average, .380 on-base percentage, .550 slugging rate, and 141 wRC+. He played 76 postseason games, hitting .259 with a .365 OBP, including 13 homers and 41 RBIs. The fact that the Yankees let Gallo use Rodriguez’s number frustrated him, especially since he didn’t pan out and ended up being criticized out of the Bronx.

“It did not make me happy,” Rodriguez told Roberts and Barber.

Rodriguez isn’t afraid to voice his opinion about his former team, especially when it comes to their performance. Unfortunately, the Bombers feel as though Rodriguez’s success with the team is stained, potentially by steroid allegations. However, many players used steroids during that era, and while it was certainly frowned upon and banned, it is possible that played a part in their decision not to retire his number. Of course, that could change over time, especially as he starts to raise awareness of the subject.

“I’m too critical to the Yankees, and that doesn’t help my case,” Rodriguez said. “But I get paid to tell the truth, and if you guys ask me a question, I’m going to tell you exactly as aI see it and not sugarcoat it because I want my number retired. If it’s not retired, so be it.”

Mentioned in this article:

More about: