Giants’ Brian Daboll details new approach toward building offensive scheme

new york giants, kenny golladay
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The New York Giants have a tall task ahead of them, trying to rebuild the offense and situate a new scheme. Hiring Brian Daboll as the team’s new head coach and Mike Kafka to serve as offensive coordinator clearly indicates the team has a new mantra in place.

Management is committed to developing Daniel Jones for the 2022 season, but he is only as good as the pieces around him. The Giants have been the most injured team since 2009, with the majority of their weapons last year going down one way or another.

Daboll spoke to the media earlier this week, hitting on Saquon Barkley’s trade rumors and how he plans to build a scheme that extrapolates the strengths of each individual player.



“Look, with good players that’s what you need to be successful,” Daboll said. “Those guys are out there doing it and they’re out there playing the one on one game when it’s man to man coverage. Zone is a little bit different, we have to be pretty detailed on our zone assignments and understand the spacing on the quarterback and be where they’re supposed to be but absolutely. I think you’d be foolish if you don’t take input from the guys that are out there doing it.”

The Giants’ offense will likely feature more passing:

Daboll called passing plays at nearly a 70% clip during this time with the Buffalo Bills last season, indicating he wants his quarterback to sit in the pocket and allow his receivers to do the work. That method only operates efficiently if the OL can pass-block, something JM Joe Schoen has tried to solve this off-season despite having minimal salary space.

However, Daboll is connecting with each individual offensive playmaker, trying to figure out what makes them tick and what type of plays they prefer to run. One thing that I love about his coaching style is coordination and communication. He coherently soaks up information from the players and utilizes it to extract absolute value.

For example, the Giants may look to deploy Kadarius Toney in creative ways, getting him into open space with screen passes and slants. Kenny Golladay is a downfield receiver who dominates in man coverage. Allowing him to exercise those skills is essential, but former OC Jason Garrett failed to give him the proper opportunities.

So far, Daboll has the right idea regarding scheme development, but we won’t know how successful it is until the Giants put it on the football field. We’ve been stung by the optimism bug before.