Former Mets’ pitcher has some harsh criticism for Rob Manfred

New York Yankees, New York Mets, Marcus Stroman
Mar 4, 2020; Port St. Lucie, Florida, USA; New York Mets starting pitcher Marcus Stroman (0) delivers a pitch against the St. Louis Cardinals during the third inning at First Data Field. Mandatory Credit: Sam Navarro-USA TODAY Sports

MLB and the Players Association are still negotiating with the hope of reaching a new collective bargaining agreement (CBA) without putting the start of the 2022 season in jeopardy. At this point, it’s highly unlikely that spring training starts on time. A current MLB pitcher, one who played for the New York Mets recently, had some strong words for Commissioner Rob Manfred for being in front of what could be the league’s darkest time and for failing to come up with fair solutions in the conflict.

Stroman, who was traded to the Mets in 2019 and pitched there until last season, slammed Manfred and expressed his disappointment because of the slow pace of negotiations.

“Manclown and his boys need to figure it out and stop ruining the game of baseball,” the pitcher, now a member of the Chicago Cubs, tweeted Sunday as a reply to a Sports Illustrated story about the 2022 campaign potentially not starting on time.

Several Mets have also criticized the league

Players such as current member of the New York Mets Max Scherzer (who is a strong voice in the union) recently expressed their displeasure with the current situation. The league, which is the side who started the current lockout, now wants a federal mediator, but the union refuses to have any third parties “helping” the negotiations.

It’s not the first time Stroman tweets words of support for his fellow players, and he also made it clear recently that he feels for fans, who can also be considered losers in this whole charade.

Another current member of the Mets’ roster, Trevor May, said the Commissioner is not negotiating in good faith, per The Score.

Pitchers and catchers are scheduled to report to training camps on February 14, and the first spring training games are scheduled for February 26. At this point, unless something drastic and unexpected happens, it’s safe to say neither will happen on time. The baseball community is patiently waiting for a quick resolution, but MLB isn’t helping matters with its refusal to acknowledge the players’ needs.