One big reason the New York Giants should move on from Jason Garrett after 2021 season

New York Giants, Austin Mack, Jason Garrett
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For the second consecutive season, the New York Giants are averaging fewer than 20 points per game on offense. While injuries and a poor offensive line have contributed heavily toward the unit’s demise, coordinator Jason Garrett has failed to adapt and get the ball to his primary playmakers.

Injuries to left tackle Andrew Thomas, Nick Gates, Shane Lemieux, and more have forced quarterback Daniel Jones to get rid of the ball faster than he would like this season. There are ways to scheme around having a poor pass-blocking; just ask the Las Vegas Raiders, who rank 24th in the league in that category.

Derek Carr had several games this season with elite passing grades, and while he’s thrown several interceptions, including two against the Giants this past weekend, he also has 13 touchdowns through the air and 2,565 yards. Over the past two weeks, Jones hasn’t thrown more than three passes beyond 20+ yards downfield, while Carr continuously takes shots and risks to help create more production despite his lackluster OL — a 3-and-out can be just as inefficient as an INT downfield on a deep throw.



Garrett has a poor job scheming players downfield, but there’s one statistic that stands out primarily as his biggest weakness. In the red zone, the Giants have a 44% success rate in scoring touchdowns, often settling for field goals, which is unacceptable in a league that centers around point production.

Some may point to the consistent injuries for the Giants’ lack of success, but the playcalling has been abysmal. Far too often, we have seen Garrett dial-up red zone fades and half-back dives. If you take a peek over at the Los Angeles Rams, you can see a modernized scheme that focuses on rub routes, speed-outs, and concepts that get their best receivers open. The Giants simply don’t know how to use players like Kenny Golladay, Kadarius Toney, or even in Sterling Shepard.

Settling as the last place team in red-zone efficiency should give a clear indication that Garrett must be replaced at the end of the year. One candidate that stands out is current TE coach and senior offensive advisor Freddie Kitchens, who has had more success throwing the ball downfield in the past with Baker Mayfield and the Cleveland Browns. It seems as if ownership is too embarrassed to force Garrett to give up playcalling now, so expect a change at season’s end when Garrett’s contract expires.