Mets’ legend baffled by continual rejection of team’s front office positions

Andres Chavez
Simeon Woods-Richardson
Mar 23, 2019; Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA; A view of the Grapefruit League logo on the hat of New York Mets second baseman Robinson Cano (24) prior to the game against the Atlanta Braves at Champion Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports

The New York Mets kicked off their offseason by announcing general manager Zack Scott wouldn’t be back with the team regardless of the outcome of his DUI case. As a result, they have been actively looking for a president of baseball operations and a general manager, too.

They have talked with at least ten people, including David Stearns, Billy Beane, Theo Epstein, Billy Eppler, Matt Arnold, Raquel Ferreira, Michael Girsch, Jean Afterman, Scott Harris, Brandon Gomes, and Mark Shapiro, about one of their top executive positions. They swung and missed with everyone, bafflingly.

Mets’ legend John Franco finds it hard to believe. “I’m scratching my head every day, when I read about people turning it down,” he said, per SNY, while explaining the position would be an ideal one because the team has an owner willing to spend.

Franco admitted, however, that some or most of the candidates may have passed on the chance because they like their current positions with their respective teams or because of family reasons.

Nobody wants to take on the Mets’ challenge

Franco, who leads the Mets in saves (276) and appearances (695), said at the fundraising gala for Joe Torre’s Safe At Home Foundation in midtown Manhattan that “there’s no place like New York. I was born and raised here, played here 15 years, was team captain. I’ve worked with the organization a little bit. There’s a new owner looking to spend.

“I speak to a lot of former players and teammates and we’re speechless on what’s going on and why it’s taking so long to get a president of baseball operations or a GM or even a manager. It shouldn’t be like that for a big-market team.”

The Mets have several holes to fill in the roster, particularly third base, center fielder, and the always-necessary pitching. “But you still have to have a face, a GM, and a manager. If you had a manager, maybe he could help out and recruit some players. That’s the difficult part right now,” Franco admitted.